View Poll Results: Joker (Todd Phillips)

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  • Comedy

    10 71.43%
  • Tragedy

    4 28.57%
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Results 126 to 134 of 134

Thread: Joker (Todd Phillips)

  1. #126
    Quote Quoting Skitch (view post)
    So in the pantheon of all comic book related films, sounds like slightly upper mid tier?
    In terms of how much I actually liked it? Middle. In terms of appreciation for at least trying something outside of the norm, upper tier. I'm happier to have watched this than to have watched, say Ant Man 2, even though I liked Ant Man 2 more and it is more successful at what it attempts. Probably doesn't make sense, but there you have it.
    Last 10 Movies Seen
    (90+ = canonical, 80-89 = brilliant, 70-79 = strongly recommended, 60-69 = good, 50-59 = mixed, 40-49 = below average with some good points, 30-39 = poor, 20-29 = bad, 10-19 = terrible, 0-9 = soul-crushingly inept in every way)

    El
    (1973) 70
    The Day After
    (1983
    ) 63
    Duck, You Sucker (1971) 68
    Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) 71
    Noriko’s Dinner Party
    (2005) 61
    The Third Murder (2017) 56

    /Audition
    (1999) 85

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  2. #127
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
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    Makes sense. I'm not arguing your points, just curious.

  3. #128
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting [ETM] (view post)
    Well, if it was an unpleasant experience that engaged you it can be good. But Joker doesn't ask any real questions nor does it offer any insight beyond generic tidbits about inequality and abuse. Sure, it is handsomely packaged, like I said in my first post, but the veneer is too thin to cover up the clumsy innards.
    I'm gonna have to disagree with that bit wholeheartedly as I've been questioning my own thoughts about mental illness since ive watched it. As for offering any insight, does it have to? It's a movie, not a college course.

    For the record, I dont even know if I'm putting this flick upper tier. I know its problematic. I dont care if people hate it, but seems like some are expecting it to be the most perfect mindblowing perfection ever or go fuck itself.

  4. #129
    Administrator Ezee E's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting transmogrifier (view post)
    Somewhat unrelated, but this reminded me of someone online (Letterboxd I think) saying that Joker is kind a sad reflection of where mainstream movies have ended up - this exact same movie about someone not the Joker probably wouldn’t have been greenlit, let alone make any money. So going forward, all our adult genre films need to have a superhero angle? A romantic comedy starring Catwoman? A regular legal thriller but with Harvey Dent the main character? We are deep in an era of pandering to references. “I recognize that!”
    That is a sad reflection of the movie business right now, and why I think more and more of the "adult" movies will just end up on Netflix instead of in a theater.

    Good Time (2017) - **
    El Camino - *** 1/2
    Joker - *** 1/2


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  5. #130
    The more I think about it, the more this seems like a dumber comic-book version of Fight Club that spends far too much time on watching Tyler Durden do stupid shit just because, you know, Batman!, and not enough time on the environment that (a) allowed loonies like Tyler Durden to seem like an attractive alternative and (b) the ramifications of allowing loonies like Tyler Durden to take power. Basically this seems like one of those silly movie pitches - it's DC meets Fight Club, but 70s! - that you see pitched in a Hollywood satire, but made real.
    Last 10 Movies Seen
    (90+ = canonical, 80-89 = brilliant, 70-79 = strongly recommended, 60-69 = good, 50-59 = mixed, 40-49 = below average with some good points, 30-39 = poor, 20-29 = bad, 10-19 = terrible, 0-9 = soul-crushingly inept in every way)

    El
    (1973) 70
    The Day After
    (1983
    ) 63
    Duck, You Sucker (1971) 68
    Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) 71
    Noriko’s Dinner Party
    (2005) 61
    The Third Murder (2017) 56

    /Audition
    (1999) 85

    /Toy Story
    (1995) 65
    Vice (2018) 57
    The Counterfeit Traitor (1962) 62

    Stuff at Letterboxd
    Listening Habits at LastFM

  6. #131
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
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    Watched this in theater tonight. I absolutely got that Great Value Fight Club vibe. Even at the first (pertinant) scene, my wife looked and me whispered "that's in his head, right?" At least those scenes were shot in such a way that you could pick up on it, instead of flat out lying to you. That's an even worse technique imo.

    Still have issues with that ending.

  7. #132
    Cinematographer Idioteque Stalker's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting transmogrifier (view post)
    (Fleck doesn't seem to be all that clued into pop culture, so the music cues (e.g., Gary Glitter on the stairs) seem artificial and audience pandering rather than reflecting anything going on inside the character)
    This is a great point. Feels like an iconic scene, but I didn't love the music choice here. Should've been opera.

  8. #133
    Quote Quoting Skitch (view post)
    Watched this in theater tonight. I absolutely got that Great Value Fight Club vibe. Even at the first (pertinant) scene, my wife looked and me whispered "that's in his head, right?" At least those scenes were shot in such a way that you could pick up on it, instead of flat out lying to you. That's an even worse technique imo.

    Still have issues with that ending.
    In Fight Club's case, the film is expressly driven by Edward Norton's character's narration (he is in every scene), and because he is equally in the dark regarding the big reveal, it justifies both the "deception" on the film-maker's part and the use of the flashbacks to recontextualize what the narrator had told us before the reveal because Norton's character is literally doing the same thing at the same time, and we have been in his head the whole time. But in the Joker, the filmmakers are literally just inserting the flashbacks for the slow kids down the back.
    Last 10 Movies Seen
    (90+ = canonical, 80-89 = brilliant, 70-79 = strongly recommended, 60-69 = good, 50-59 = mixed, 40-49 = below average with some good points, 30-39 = poor, 20-29 = bad, 10-19 = terrible, 0-9 = soul-crushingly inept in every way)

    El
    (1973) 70
    The Day After
    (1983
    ) 63
    Duck, You Sucker (1971) 68
    Young Mr. Lincoln (1939) 71
    Noriko’s Dinner Party
    (2005) 61
    The Third Murder (2017) 56

    /Audition
    (1999) 85

    /Toy Story
    (1995) 65
    Vice (2018) 57
    The Counterfeit Traitor (1962) 62

    Stuff at Letterboxd
    Listening Habits at LastFM

  9. #134
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting transmogrifier (view post)
    In Fight Club's case, the film is expressly driven by Edward Norton's character's narration (he is in every scene), and because he is equally in the dark regarding the big reveal, it justifies both the "deception" on the film-maker's part and the use of the flashbacks to recontextualize what the narrator had told us before the reveal because Norton's character is literally doing the same thing at the same time, and we have been in his head the whole time. But in the Joker, the filmmakers are literally just inserting the flashbacks for the slow kids down the back.
    Yep I totally agree.

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