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Thread: The Book Discussion Thread

  1. #6676
    Moderator TGM's Avatar
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    Cross-posting here. So it's here now! Book Four of The Ninja Kat series, VELCRO: POLLUTED WAR, is now available! Check it out! http://cwiddop.blogspot.com/2017/11/...available.html


  2. #6677
    What is best in life? D_Davis's Avatar
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    Got my book shelves back up after putting in a new floor, painting and putting up new trim. My books have been packed away for nearly 6 months because of complications with the project. It was a ton of fun opening up all the boxes, and putting everything back on the shelves. I missed my old paper friends. Also boxed up three boxes of books to sell.


  3. #6678
    The Pan megladon8's Avatar
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    That’s a beautiful set up, D. Sometimes the act of touching and looking at all of the books as you (re)organize can be so satisfying.

    I really need to get reading again. I’ve been without the bug for nearly 2 years now. Started a few things that didn’t catch my interest and dropped them, but didn’t pick anything else up.

  4. #6679
    What is best in life? D_Davis's Avatar
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    I haven't been reading much since Trump was elected. Can't seem to focus on anything except for the complete destruction of my country.

  5. #6680
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
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    Not sure where to put this - I read the book The Disaster Artist in one day. It's compulsively readable. I felt a little bad about what Sestero was doing - revealing intimate details of his close friend who's obsessed with privacy to the point of paranoia - but when I was capable of leaving that aside, the portrait of the character is fascinating.

  6. #6681
    Social Retard Isaac's Avatar
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    Sue Grafton died, and she was only one book away from finishing her alphabet series, having published Y is for Yesterday earlier this year. I haven't read any of the books, but I am oddly disappointed.

  7. #6682
    What is best in life? D_Davis's Avatar
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    Yes!


  8. #6683
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    Telegraph Avenue

    I read a few reviews and reactions after this, and it seems like I chose the wrong Chabon to be my first, reportedly one of his weakest (maybe the weakest?). It’s certainly charming and full of gorgeous proses, each character so distinctly well-drawn, and his ambitious scope makes the place and its people feel so lived in. But they are buried under all those momentum-sapping run-on descriptions, metaphors, anecdotes, and references. They are always compulsively readable and colorful (also nice that the film Black Panther came out shortly after I started this, so the key references all resonate), but they too often cross over from being some engrossing world-building details into a feeling of someone fulfilling word counts, interrupting the book’s flow too much.

    Also, the most prominent storylines, which are the estranged father-son relationship(s) and the fate of record store, happen to be the least interesting to me. I want to spend more time on the two women’s midwifery practice and the complex, rather achingly portrayed relationship between the two teenaged sons instead. Apart from a few stings from those two stories, the ending kind of petered out too. 2.5/5
    Midnight Run (1988) - 9
    The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) - 8.5
    The Adventures of Robinhood (1938) - 8
    Sisters (1973) - 6.5
    Shin Godzilla (2016) - 7.5

  9. #6684
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    For all his gifts as a writer on display in The Bone Clocks (rich character-building; decade-spanning narrative with serious momentum; intricate, lovely writing), David Mitchell turns out to be just barely adequate, borderline on uninspired at times, when it comes to fantasy. The long penultimate chapter, which finally goes into full-blown fantasy, feels a bit deflating after the tantalizing and evocative glimpses of its hidden premise for the majority of the book. He strains a bit to convey the rules, wonders, and dangers when it's time to go into that world fully, and it doesn't quite come alive easily for him. Thankfully by that point we are immersed in quite a number of characters in their rich, humane tales (a weird, tediously fact-dumping section about Iraq War asides), both alive and dead, and even on opposite sides of good and evil, that we are still invested in the outcome.

    And Mitchell grounds that fantasy well and brings it home splendidly with the graceful final chapter, where he projects the future of our inevitably post-apocalyptic world in all its savageness and persisting humanity. Amidst that environment, he shows both the ripple effects of the preceding chapter, and how, for all its out-of-this-world elements, even that fantasy interlude can turn out to be more and more of a (life-changing) footnote in the face of world constantly changing and time marching on. 4/5
    Midnight Run (1988) - 9
    The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) - 8.5
    The Adventures of Robinhood (1938) - 8
    Sisters (1973) - 6.5
    Shin Godzilla (2016) - 7.5

  10. #6685
    Scott of the Antarctic Milky Joe's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting Peng (view post)
    Telegraph Avenue

    I read a few reviews and reactions after this, and it seems like I chose the wrong Chabon to be my first, reportedly one of his weakest (maybe the weakest?).
    I would recommend Wonder Boys. That's one book I could read every year and never get tired of it, and I'm not even a huge fan of Chabon. Cavalier and Clay is probably good too but I haven't read that one.
    ‎The severed arm perfectly acquitted itself, because of the simplicity of its wishes and its total lack of doubt.

  11. #6686
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    Well, I didn't read Wonder Boys, even if at this point I'm ready for some medium-sized-or-less Chabon. I did read his most famous book though, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and liked it a bit less than I expected, even if I still liked it a lot. Time jumps and subplot/character dead-ends mute the impacts of some intriguing transition phases in a decade-spanning story too much, and of the haunting power that some relationships or tangents should inspire more. It's also clear now, in my second Chabon, that I will always struggle with the way he reaches a new character or location and then backs a long way up to provide intimate background details for them. This is done way better here than in Telegraph Avenue though because it's often interwoven with the intersection of history and comic book milieu, so it mostly adds to the momentum. Best of all, the titular pair are such vivid characters to be invested in, exceeding anyone in his last book I read. The tenor of World War II and comic books' places in it are already an interesting and layered setting to spend time in, but it's the evolving characters of Kavalier and Clay, along with their relationships, that make it consistently gripping and occasionally moving. 4/5
    Midnight Run (1988) - 9
    The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) - 8.5
    The Adventures of Robinhood (1938) - 8
    Sisters (1973) - 6.5
    Shin Godzilla (2016) - 7.5

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