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Thread: Cigars and other smokeables

  1. #1
    The Pan
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    Cigars and other smokeables



    So I've fairly recently taken up the hobby/pastime of smoking cigars. Nothing major - I know of folks who have certain brands as "morning sticks", "afternoon sticks", "evening sticks" and the like, smoking 4-5 a day.

    Hell, Sigmund Freud reportedly smoked 20+ cigars a day!

    No, I smoke 1 or 2 a week, and am really enjoying it. While it's not for all, I find it quite a great flavour experience. I'm developing my tastes and determining what region's tobacco I like best, what sizes of cigars I prefer (yes, different sizes of an identical blend can taste very different) and brands I prefer.

    So I'm going to be doing write-ups here as I smoke new cigars. I'm still at the point where I'm just trying lots of different types to - as I said - determine what I love and would be willing to spend money on again.

    I'll also post pictures and some informationals as I go along, for anyone else here who would be interested in picking something up to try!


    My reviews will cover several pieces of information...

    -Statistics of the cigar (country, size, wrapper type [the wrapper is the outer leaf used to wrap the cigar], and overall length of time it took me to smoke it

    -Body/strength (categorized as "mild", "medium" or "full")

    -In-depth analysis of the flavours and quality of the cigar, broken down into thirds (first third, second third, etc.)

    -A final closing statement on what my overall experience was like


    Now, because I don't smoke cigarettes, my tolerance to nicotine is still very low (but building). I really, really do not enjoy the after effects of a nicotine rush (known as nicotine sickness - pale complexion, cold sweats, jitters, sometimes even vomiting).

    So for now, I'm sticking to relatively mild sticks. Mild-to-medium tends to be my preference at this point.

    There are many sticks out there (such as the Cain Double Maduro) which are basically "bragging rights" for guys to smoke and say they got through it. These sticks are so strong that even seasoned cigar smokers will experience ill effects after smoking them. I will be avoiding these cigars as best I can.

    So, my first review will be up soon!

    Any questions, feel free to ask. Like I said at the beginning, my experience is limited. But I'll try to find an answer if I don't know it

    And of course, feel free to share experiences, favourites, or suggestions!

  2. #2
    The Pan
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    This review is something I wrong back on September 26th. I decided to get some together before I started the thread, so I wouldn't keep people waiting forever.





    Ramon Allones Regional Edition Canada Petit Unico


    Size: 5 x 50 Belicoso

    Wrapper: Natural

    Body: Medium

    Strength: Mild-to-Medium

    Country: Cuba

    Smoke time: 1 hour 10 minutes


    Pre-light thoughts: This is quite a beautifully constructed stick with a firm packing and no soft spots at all. The aroma it gives off is of a sweet tobacco with a very light hint of barnyard hay or wood. The aroma is light, though, and you really need to bring it right up to your nose to pick it up - I have a few of them in my humidor and the smell of my other cigars overpowers it.

    A pre-light draw evokes a nice sweetness, and a smooth cedar flavour which reminds me of the smell of a smoke shop. Very pleasant.


    First third: It's a very firm draw. Smoke production is decent, but you really have to pull it out of the cigar with your lips if you want a substantial amount to fill your mouth. The flavours quite accurately mimic the smells the cigar gave off before lighting - a sweet tobacco and wood flavor, with a small amount of "barn" to it.

    It kind of tastes like a day working on the farm.


    Second third: I've had a few small problems with the burn, but I attribute it to the weather which is pretty gross right now - very windy, and light drizzle. I'm on a roofed patio, but still, the wind is enough that the burn is a little wonky. So, it's not the cigar's fault.

    The flavour has morphed into a deep leather and it's very good. Also the smoke production has increased a little bit - it's still a fairly firm draw, but I'm getting noticeably more smoke out.


    Final third: The leather has dissipated a bit and the flavour has returned to the original mixture of tobacco and wood. But with the hint of leather still there, it's evoking (for me) images of some of my favorite Western movies. It tastes like a horse farm, with the hay, wooden barns, and leather straps and saddles. I can imagine The Man With No Name smoking one of these.


    Ending thoughts: I enjoyed this one, though it's not my personal preference in flavour blends - I personally am more of a deep chocolate and coffee cigar smoker, which I suppose is why I gravitate more towards Maduros.

    It was very pleasant, though, with mild strength and a consistently good flavour.

    It does reinforce, though, my opinion that while Cuban cigars are great, they tend to not be all they are cracked up to me. I've smoked Nicaraguan blends that I found much richer and more pleasing. Perhaps I am uninformed as I am still, admittedly, new to the cigar world. But this is my fifth Cuban and while they have all been very good, they're not the be-all-end-all of smokes.

    I feel like it may be kind of a "forbidden fruit" thing with American smokers. *shrug*

  3. #3
    sleepy soitgoes...'s Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Smoke time: 1 hour 10 minutes
    Egads! Is this normal? I couldn't imagine smoking anything for that long.

    I'll be reading this, but to be honest for me a cigar is meant to be emptied and then refilled with different, better product.

  4. #4
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    Quote Quoting soitgoes... (view post)
    Egads! Is this normal? I couldn't imagine smoking anything for that long.

    I'll be reading this, but to be honest for me a cigar is meant to be emptied and then refilled with different, better product.

    Yes, most cigars take 1 hour + to smoke, unless you're looking at so called "junior" sizes (about 4.5 inches or shorter).

    Some churchills (7+ inches) can take up to 2 1/2 hours to smoke.

  5. #5
    The Pan
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    This review is from Sept. 27th, though I'd smoked it about a week prior...




    Montecristo No. 4


    Size: 5 x 42 Corona

    Wrapper: Natural

    Body: Mild-to-Medium

    Strength: Mild

    Country: Cuba

    Smoke time: 45 minutes


    Pre-light thoughts: This is the second of these I've smoked and they're becoming a go-to favorite when I want a relatively mild but consistent cigar. It has a soft wrapper and a very sweet smell of tobacco, cedar and a hint of vanilla.


    First third: Perfect draw. Lots of rich, creamy smoke which echoes the pre-light aromas - sweet tobacco, wood, and a very light hint of vanilla.

    Flavour-wise, this is one of the most pleasant smokes I have found so far. And I use pleasant quite literally - it's not powerful, it's not a rich dessert stick. It is light and perfect on the palette. Something I could smoke just about any time and enjoy the heck out of it.


    Second third: Consistent. The vanilla dips in and out, sometime morphing into a subtle coca flavour almost as if you were tasting a packet of hot chocolate mix.

    The burn continues perfectly. It's not completely straight, but there are no dips or valleys at all. It's not canoeing. It's pretty much a perfect burn.


    Final third: 35 minutes in and I'm nearing the end. Like I said earlier, it's a very consistent, pleasant smoke. The transitions are subtle, few and far between. But what the stick lacks in complexity it more than makes up in being a purely pleasurable mild-to-medium smoke.


    Ending thoughts: I laugh when I see that my last review ended with me saying how I find Cubans generally underwhelming, and now I'm citing a Cuban as one of my favorites.

    I'm at a lack of words to describe it. Not because it's that "WOW-ing" but just because I feel like I've said all there needs to be said at this point. I really, really like these cigars a lot. If I could afford them as every-day smokes, I would.

    Anyone who is looking for something on the milder side of things that still has a delicious array of sweet flavours should definitely give it a shot.

  6. #6
    Winston* Classic Winston*'s Avatar
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    Do you smoke your cigars inside your house?

  7. #7
    The Pan
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    Quote Quoting Winston* (view post)
    Do you smoke your cigars inside your house?

    No, outside.

    Even when I live on my own, I will not smoke inside. I really don't like that smell lingering in the curtains, carpets, and ambient air.

  8. #8
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
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    Can we post pictures of sexy women and cigars? I live for that shit.




  9. #9
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    Storing Cigars

    Ever heard of a humidor?

    A humidor is wooden box made of aged Spanish cedar. This wood is used because of its remarkable ability to store and expel moisture without expanding/contracting, or warping.

    It also smells freaking divine.

    A humidor can come in many sizes. I have a humidor that can hold 35 cigars, and just today received a totally free 75 cigar humidor because the 35 count one was not the exact colour and shape I wanted. Score!

    This is just about what my 35 ct. humidor looks like...







    However, even my new 75 ct. humidor is tiny compared to what you'll see with many "enthusiasts". They will often have cabinet or closet humidors - sometimes bought, sometimes made themselves. These hold thousands upon thousands of cigars, usually never even removed from the boxes they came in.


    Storing cigars requires a very precise set of conditions. First off, any good humidor is air-tight. You can do what is called the "whoosh test" to find if your humidor is air tight or not - lift the lid, then drop it. Does it make a light "whoosh" sound when the lid closes, as it forces the air out? If so, you have a good seal on your humidor.

    Secondly, the humidor must maintain a fairly high humidity level. 65% to 70% humidity is ideal. You can be a few percentages off in either direction without worry, but if you're dipping into the 40's or spiking up into the 80's or 90's for an extended period of time, this can spell big trouble.

    What kind of trouble?

    Dips in humidity (say, 50% or lower) for a few days to weeks can make your cigars dry out. This will cause the wrapper (that outer leaf the cigar is rolled in) to crack and break apart, and the inner tobacco to take on a dusty flavour. It will also burn too quickly, causing off flavours.

    Spikes in humidity can cause mold to grow in the tobacco.

    Now, of these two situations, the former is the most easily dealt-with. As long as a cigar hasn't crumbled apart from being too dry, you can usually salvage it by storing it in a properly humidified atmosphere (say, a better humidor!). It may never be perfect again, but at least it'll be smokeable.

    Once mold starts to grow, though, you pretty much just have to throw your cigar out. And do it quick! Mold can actually transfer between cigars - so if you have one moldy cigar in a pile of healthy ones, it may transfer its infection to all the cigars around it. In just a few weeks you could end up with a whole humidor full of moldy cigars that must be thrown out.

  10. #10
    Winston* Classic Winston*'s Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    No, outside.

    Even when I live on my own, I will not smoke inside. I really don't like that smell lingering in the curtains, carpets, and ambient air.
    Good man.

  11. #11
    The Pan
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    Storing Cigars (continued)

    So now that you have a humidor, you need to do two things:

    Season the humidor
    Install a humidification system

    Seasoning your humidor is something that is often done for you when you buy it, so ask the seller about it. If they don't, it's fairly simple.

    The overall idea is that you want to get the wood very, very moist all the way through, so that it begins with a high humidity level and makes your humidification system work more efficiently.

    Here is a great tutorial video for doing a good job of seasoning your humidor, and installing a good humidification system...

    [youtube]drh1uBC5AGI[/youtube]


    Basically, do your research, and make sure you put the time (and sometimes, a few extra bucks) into doing a good job and using the right equipment. It's worth it in the long run.

  12. #12
    Administrator Ezee E's Avatar
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    How much is a humidor anyway?

    Le Choc Du Futur - ** 1/2
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  13. #13
    The Pan
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    Quote Quoting Ezee E (view post)
    How much is a humidor anyway?

    Depends how and where you get them, and how big.

    My 35 ct. one was a total of $45 (with the shipping and everything).

    It's a good humidor with a good seal, but hardly luxurious.

    My brother has a fancy one with a glass top and it was I think about $120.

  14. #14
    Administrator Ezee E's Avatar
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    I wouldn't want anything fancy. The one pictured would suit just well.

    Keep going with this. I like it. I just wish i had the money to buy some.

    Le Choc Du Futur - ** 1/2
    TFW NO - 1/2 *
    Beastie Boys Story - **


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  15. #15
    The Pan
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    Quote Quoting Ezee E (view post)
    I wouldn't want anything fancy. The one pictured would suit just well.

    Keep going with this. I like it. I just wish i had the money to buy some.

    I can send you a nice array of different smokes I will have tons once I get to NYC.

  16. #16
    Administrator Ezee E's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    I can send you a nice array of different smokes I will have tons once I get to NYC.
    I can reply with reviews of my own, and I'll pay for the shipping if you're serious. Haha.

    Le Choc Du Futur - ** 1/2
    TFW NO - 1/2 *
    Beastie Boys Story - **


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  17. #17
    The Pan
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    And now, a photo appreciation of Teresa Merchant, the "smoking hot cigar chick".




    More in the spoiler tags...

    []

  18. #18
    Replacing Luck Since 1984 Dukefrukem's Avatar
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    This is a hobby I wish I could bring myself to try, but the thought of smoking anything is so damn unappealing to me. :-/

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  19. #19
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    Here's something I just wrote up now. My brother gave me this cigar on the weekend, and I finished smoking it about 40 minutes ago.





    Camacho SLR Maduro Perfecto #1


    Size: 4.5 x 50 Perfecto

    Wrapper: Maduro

    Body: Full

    Strength: Medium-to-Full

    Country: Honduras

    Smoke time: 30 minutes


    Pre-light thoughts: This is the very first perfecto I have ever smoked and I have to admit, I am going into it with some preconceived negative notions. Just about every review I have seen or read about this particular style/size of cigar says that it's, well, kind of annoying. It's just a "neat" shape, which adds absolutely nothing to the flavours or experience of smoking the cigar, and if anything hinders it. The cigars are so small to begin with that once you cut the cap off, you're already down to a mere 4 inches or less.

    That being said, the cigar is beautiful. It's got a great hand-rolled look - where it's a perfect roll, but the small "imperfections" make it look homey.

    The smell is divine. A potent, dark tobacco smell with some chocolate right in there with it.

    A pre-light draw gives rich flavours of sweet, candy-like tobacco.


    First third: 10 minutes in and I'm about a third down. Already, I don't like this perfecto shape. Maybe it's just this particular cigar, but here's my experience:

    The cigar is triple-capped. I cut just the first cap off, and the other two fell off, bringing some of the wrapper with them.

    It's not enough to ruin the cigar, and it's not falling apart in my mouth or anything, but jeez...talk about shoddy construction.

    The flavours are very, very rich. Chocolate and coffee take the forefront, which I'm definitely not complaining about. I could see this being a cigar that would take the place of dessert after a meal.

    No complaints about the flavour or draw - it's just the physical construction of the thing which is seriously lacking.


    Second third: This is shaping up to be quite a powerful cigar. I've got my glass of ice water here with me and am taking a sip every draw or two, but man, already getting a little bit light-headed after just 20 minutes.

    The flavours have not really changed, but since the cigar is so darn small, the smoke is already starting to really heat up. I imagine I'll get another 10 or 15 minutes out of this.


    Final third: 30 minutes in, I've got a little bit less than an inch left as a nub and I'm going to be calling it quits soon. Probably just one or two more draws.

    It's a delicious stick, don't get me wrong. TONS of rich smoke, the draw is nearly effortless. And it's got a power kick to it.


    Ending thoughts: This was a beautiful tasting cigar, I just wish that it had been constructed a little better. Like I said at the beginning, it's a triple-cap, but snipping just the first cap off caused the rest to come with it, which is disappointing.

    I can also now say that yes, if you're starting to feel the effects of nicotine sickness, something very sugary will help it subside. I came inside and after about 5 minutes I started to feel a little woozy, so I downed a can of Sprite and it worked like a charm. That was about 15 minutes ago now and I feel fine - in fact, I'm a little hungry!

    Overall, it was a good stick. It really was. I'd love to get a couple in a different size and shape, though, because I really was not a fan of my first perfecto experience.

  20. #20
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    A word on cutting and lighting...


    So you have a cigar, and a half decent cutter (though to be honest, cutters can be quite expensive, so until you know that you're willing to spend $20+ on one, a nice sharp knife or pair of scissors will do - NEVER use your teeth!).

    Where do you cut it? And then, how do you light it properly?

    Yes, there are techniques to both of these things, and it's not some hoity-toity issue of being "classy", like holding your little finger in the air while drinking a cup of tea. An improperly cut cigar can have many problems such as falling apart or unraveling, providing too tight of a draw (not getting enough smoke) or too loose of a draw (getting too much smoke). An improperly lit cigar can burn unevenly, or become too hot thereby ruining the flavours and making the whole thing taste bitter.

    So let's start with the cut (excuse my poor photoshop skills)...





    Cigars having "double caps" is not an uncommon phenomenon. In fact, triple caps are similarly common, especially on torpedo or belicoso cigars (cigars where the foot tapers down to a point).

    In these cases, JUST snip off the first (top) cap. If you find that the draw is still too tight, snip another cap off. Other than that, you may just have to wait for the cigar to expand with the heat, and loosen up.

    Now on to lighting...

    Lighting a cigar requires that it first be "toasted".

    Toasting a cigar is when you hold the cigar at a 45 degree angle over an indirect flame, and allow the edge to blacken.



    It is imperative that you use either a butane lighter, or a match made specifically for cigars. You may notice that a kerosene lighter (like a Zippo) gives off quite a strong smell - that smell will be transferred into the cigar as an off-flavour.

    Use a butane lighter - even a BIC works great - and toast the cigar.

    Once the cigar is properly toasted, take a draw. It may already be lit.

    If not, use your proper lighter/match to light it completely as you take a draw.

    Simple!

  21. #21
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    From September 30th...





    Don Tomas Clasico


    Size: 5.5 x 50 Robusto

    Wrapper: Natural

    Body: Medium

    Strength: Mild-to-Medium

    Country: Honduras

    Smoke time: 1 hour 15 minutes


    Pre-light thoughts: I was really looking forward to this one. It has one of the most pleasant aromas of anything in my humidor, with a beautifully soft, natural wrapper and what looks like very solid construction. After snipping off the first cap (it has a double) I took a pre-light draw and it tasted of fairly standard tobacco and cedar, but if there's anything I've learned with the sticks I've smoked, they can be very unpredictable (ie, a basic tobacco and cedar flavor at the beginning does not mean it'll be that same flavour after a third, or a half, or even two thirds).


    First third: This cigar lit very easily and evenly and right off the bat was giving very pleasant flavours of - surprise! - tobacco and cedar. The smoke is a little bit harsh to begin, but even after 5 draws it is smoothing out quite a bit.

    The smoke is not especially thick but there's lots of it. Having no draw problems at all.

    Seems to be about a medium body at this point.


    Second third: The flavours have begun to change ever-so-subtly into a bit of a mellow chocolate and a hint of leather. I really find these are two of my favorite flavours, and having them blend together so nicely is a treat to be sure.

    The smoke has become slightly richer and creamier, and the draw remains absolutely divine. I wish every cigar I smoked could have this level of perfection in its draw and construction. The burn is absolutely razor-sharp and the ash is holding on tight after a good inch and a half.


    Final third: While the flavours didn't really change again, they remained so very nice right to the end. I actually smoked this one down farther than I normally do, to the point where there was only about an inch left of it. It wasn't until the smoke was getting unpleasantly hot that I tossed the nub.

    Truly a great smoke through and through.


    Ending thoughts: Considering the bargain price of these cigars, I think they may be my new go-to for an every day cigar. A pleasant experience from start to finish, with a consistent medium body and some rich flavours.

  22. #22
    The Pan
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    I'll preface this by saying I am very proud to have officially smoked my first full-strength cigar without feeling any ill effects afterwards.

    It's true - smoking on a full stomach really helps a lot.





    Capoeira Professor


    Size: 5 x 50 Robusto

    Wrapper: Maduro

    Body: Medium-to-Full

    Strength: Full

    Country: Honduras

    Smoke time: 1 hour


    Pre-light thoughts: This is the very first cigar I purchased online. Well, actually if you want to get technical, it's the second - I purchased this on top of the box of Oliva Serie G I shared with my brother. But it was part of the very first online order I ever made!

    Aside from the rather silly wrapper (a break-dancer for your symbol? Really?) The cigar is beautiful. A toothy maduro wrapper surrounds a tightly packed stick which smells of chocolate and sweet tobacco - you know, come to think of it, just about every maduro I've had has smelled like this.

    But yes, it's a fine looking cigar. A pre-light draw evokes flavours of very rich tobacco.


    First third: This thing is burning absolutely RAZOR sharp. Not a single dip or valley, no tunneling - it's like the poster child for the perfect burn.

    The flavours are of very, very strong coffee and burnt toast. I know that second one may not sound overly appealing to some, but it's quite pleasant.

    This reminds me of the few times I've made coffee with true, rich Ehtiopian beans - every flavour is dark, rich and delicious.

    Smoke production is on the light side, but the flavour is very strong.


    Second third: The flavours haven't so much changed as added another layer of smooth chocolate. Imagine topping a breakfast of coffee and toast with your favorite dark chocolate treat - that's this cigar.

    Burn continues to be pristine, and smoke production has picked up a bit but is still nowhere near a creamy, rich, chewy texture.


    Final third: The flavours have not morphed any more since the addition of the chocolate, but I am sad to say that there are some burn issues occurring now.

    With about an inch and a half left in the cigar, the ash is starting to flower and the wrapper is slowly cracking and peeling away as I take each draw.

    It's not ruining the flavour or anything, but it's a little messy. I have small pieces of the wrapper dropping every couple of draws.


    Ending thoughts: For such an incredibly cheap stick, I really enjoyed this. I got a sampler pack of 10 Capoeiras (2 of each different size) for something like 30 bucks. The flavours are consistently dark throughout, and while I personally would have preferred a little more smoke output, it was still very pleasant.

    Ending burn issues not withstanding, this was a nice smoke. I'd recommend it (but only if you could get a good deal on it - I see a bundle of 20 is now over $100, and I'd say it is NOT worth that).

  23. #23
    The Pan
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    Some very cool looking cigars, made with 3 different wrappers...



  24. #24
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Aside from the rather silly wrapper (a break-dancer for your symbol? Really?)
    No, it's capoeira.

  25. #25
    Bark! Go away Russ's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting Grouchy (view post)
    No, it's capoeira.
    Yeah, I was going to mention it earlier, but couldn't remember the Portuguese name for them. I saw a group perform when I was in Curitiba a few years ago, and they were pretty great.

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