Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Film Study/Theory Books

  1. #1
    Director Spun Lepton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    6,793

    Film Study/Theory Books

    Anybody have any film theory or film studies books they could recommend? I'm nearing the end of the book I am currently reading (Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted), and am looking for something new.

    Thankya.

  2. #2
    Administrator Ezee E's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    29,162
    Shoot, I'll have to look through my books, but I have a huge textbook of Film History that's the best Film Book there is. It covers every country, genre, period, etc, and has lots of neat photos too.

    The Circus (1928) - ***
    Black Narcissus - ****
    Come and See - ****


    twitter

  3. #3
    The Pan
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    26,391
    I have several great texts for school.

    For my film studies course last year I had a text called "Introducing Film" by Graham Roberts and Heather Wallis. It's pretty light, but good. Doesn't go into much obscure film - a lot of Hollywood classics, Hitchcock, etc. Pretty mainstream.

    Are you looking for books about film (ie analyzing, critiquing, history, etc.) or books about making films?

  4. #4
    dissolved into molecules lovejuice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    3,267
    how's about the classic deleuze's cinema?

  5. #5
    Quote Quoting lovejuice (view post)
    how's about the classic deleuze's cinema?
    Heh... I've been intermittently wading through that one. Not exactly recommended for light reading!
    Memories of the Future

    "Criticism can be monumentally creative, of course, at times highly artistic, highly personal. But it rarely relates to the work of art being assessed. It is an expression of the critic's own subjectivity." -Joyce Carol Oates, Journals

  6. #6
    Director Spun Lepton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    6,793
    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Are you looking for books about film (ie analyzing, critiquing, history, etc.) or books about making films?
    Yes!

  7. #7
    Director Spun Lepton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Minneapolis
    Posts
    6,793
    Quote Quoting lovejuice (view post)
    how's about the classic deleuze's cinema?
    I'll take a look at it before buying. I'm not necessarily looking for "light" reading, but if it seems too heavy-handed, I'll pass on it. Thanks for the recommendation, though.

  8. #8
    The Pan
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    26,391
    Quote Quoting Spun Lepton (view post)
    Yes!

    Well, if writing films is something you're interested in ,you can't go wrong with J. Michael Straczynski's The Complete Book of Scriptwriting.

    It's the text book for one of my courses.

    He uses a lot of samples from Murder, She Wrote - because he was a writer on there. Sure, it may not be the most exciting example material, but it works.

    It reads really clearly, and has helped me along.

  9. #9
    Stunt Man Justin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    498
    The only film books I have are a Kurosawa book and Giannetti's Understanding Movies. The Giannetti one is not bad, and you can get an older edition for cheap.

  10. #10
    Anything by Bordwell's good if you want something in-depth but easy to crack; he tends to be a little humorless but his insight and readability easily compensate. Just look through his output and pick the subject that appeals to you most:

    http://www.davidbordwell.net/books/

  11. #11
    i am the great went ledfloyd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6,230
    lumet's making movies is pretty good.

    hitchcock/truffaut is indispensible but might not be what you're looking for.

    bordwell's film art is pretty good as well.

  12. #12
    What is best in life? D_Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    24,138
    Quote Quoting Boner M (view post)
    Anything by Bordwell's good if you want something in-depth but easy to crack; he tends to be a little humorless but his insight and readability easily compensate. Just look through his output and pick the subject that appeals to you most:

    http://www.davidbordwell.net/books/
    Yep. His Planet Hong Kong is fascinating. One of the most in depth studies of HK filmmaking I've ever read.

  13. #13
    Old thread, good topic. I'm curious if some of you have any other recommendations to offer. Let's stretch out the parameters to include any books on film, academic or otherwise.

    Personally, the last book related to film that I read was the BFI monograph on Vertigo by Charles Barr. Given my enormous fondness for the film, I had to check this out. If you love the film (who doesn't?), it's certainly worth a read. There are a couple of other Vertigo books that I really want to check out, too: The San Francisco of Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo: Place, Pilgrimage, and Commemoration (an anthology of essays edited by Douglas A. Cunningham) and Jeffrey Katz's ​Footsteps in the Fog: Alfred Hitchcock's San Francisco.

    Other books I have my eye on include Michael Herr's Kubrick and James Naremore's well-known text on film noir, More Than Night: Film Noir in Its Contexts.

    I also picked up My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles through a bookstore sale. I've heard great things, but I'm holding off on that one until I get around to a few more of Welles' films (I'd like to revisit Citizen Kane, for example, and finally watch The Lady From Shanghai).

  14. #14
    collecting tapes Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    14,019
    I'm gonna need a write up on Haunted as well.

  15. #15
    Super Moderator dreamdead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    5,801
    It's not quite a formal study of film, but Stephen Apkon's The Age of the Image: Redefining Literacy in the a World of Screens considers how we've moved onto being an image-based, not written-based, culture. Only 50 pages in so far, but there's a cute Scorsese intro, and it seems like Apkon will continue to explore how film and film culture have presided over changing literacy styles.
    Ant-Man and the Wasp - 5
    Hereditary - 7
    Won't You Be My Neighbor? - 7.5
    The Tale - 8

  16. #16
    Guttenbergian Pop Trash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    The Yay Area
    Posts
    5,057
    Quote Quoting Ezee E (view post)
    Shoot, I'll have to look through my books, but I have a huge textbook of Film History that's the best Film Book there is. It covers every country, genre, period, etc, and has lots of neat photos too.
    Are you talking about The Oxford History of World Cinema? That thing is amazing, but it's a fuckin' mammoth tome.
    Ratings on a 1-10 scale for your pleasure:

    Da 5 Bloods - 8
    The Vast of Night - 7
    Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story - 8
    Starship Troopers - 8
    Inception - 8
    California Split - 7
    Back to the Future Part III - 6
    Back to the Future Part II - 7
    Not Another Teen Movie - 7
    Beastie Boys Story - 7

  17. #17
    I can't vouch for these yet, but here's a few examples of some of the BFI books I'm interested in. Is anyone familiar with any of these?

    []

    I recently listened to Christopher Frayling's commentary on The Innocents, which was superb, so I'm sure his writing on the film is well worth a look.
    Last edited by Gittes; 04-07-2015 at 10:58 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
An forum