Page 2878 of 2878 FirstFirst ... 18782378277828282868287628772878
Results 71,926 to 71,948 of 71948

Thread: 28 Film Discussion Threads Later

  1. #71926
    Producer Yxklyx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,156
    Before David Lynch there was... Blake Edwards!

    I've had this theory that David Lynch was inspired by film in 1961 at the age of 15. The only evidence was from the casting in Twin Peaks where Richard Beymer, Russ Tamblyn, and Piper Laurie all appear. All of them with arguably their most notable performances from West Side Story and The Hustler - in 1961.

    Now I just saw the film Experiment in Terror (1962, Blake Edwards) - if you're a Lynch fan you need to see this one (on Criterion now). The protagonist lives in Twin Peaks, San Francisco and the antagonist's last name is --- Lynch!

  2. #71927
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    None of your business
    Posts
    2,089
    I feel like I've head of that movie before. Maybe via TCM or the local TV guide.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

  3. #71928

  4. #71929
    Sunrise, Sunset Wryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    6,359
    Ritchie's The Gentlemen is surely one of his lighter works, but that fleetness makes it all the sweeter. Grant steals it away, which is something considering the excellent work from rest of cast. Loved it.
    "How is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain. Remember when I took that home wine-making course and forgot how to drive?"

    --Homer

  5. #71930
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    None of your business
    Posts
    2,089
    Thinking about how some 2000s-2010s flicks were rather prescient in what they presented. Burn After Reading easily comes to mind concerning the recent Trump fiasco and Snowpiercer may be more a rather apt metaphor for the coming climate change nightmares we are facing. Just saying. And yet both were mocked by folks on this site.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

  6. #71931
    I should revisit Burn After Reading. Snowpiercer no thanks.

  7. #71932

  8. #71933
    Evil mind, evil sword. Ivan Drago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6,991
    Two movies into the Three Colors trilogy, here's where I stand so far. From Letterboxd:

    Three Colors: Blue

    Krzysztof Kieślowski‘s first film in the Three Colors trilogy is a visceral and meditative look at grief and the lifelong process of living with it. The sad circumstances that surround Juliette Binoche’s main character are conveyed with beautiful power through shot compositions that simulate her vision blurred by tears and the motif of the color blue taking shape through an object in Julie’s apartment or stylized lighting in a given scene. The symphonic music depicts both the weight of carrying the tragedy of her husband and daughter’s death and her struggle to move forward with unrelenting grandeur, as do Binoche’s facial expressions in her tremendous breakthrough performance. It may take a second viewing to fully comprehend its philosophical ideas, but for the rest of the trilogy, this critic is along for the ride. 4/5

    Three Colors: White

    The concept of Krzysztof Kieślowski's second film in the Three Colors trilogy hasn’t necessarily aged well for some people, but with more time to ponder about the roads taken by downtrodden hairdresser Karol Karol after his wife files for divorce and frames him for burning down her own salon, the more his artistic intention is understood as being centering around romantic and economic equality. Karol loved Dominique so much he was willing to bring her down to his level economically and go incredible lengths to reach her level of twisted affection in order to prove his love for her. It’s a type of romance rarely depicted on screen with so much sympathy for both sides thanks to the tender performances from Zbigniew Zamachowski and Julie Delpy, dry sense of humor as well as the common use of white in the film whether its through motifs like when a bird hilariously sets the tone for Karol's plight, or the tones both characters reflect on their wedding day with silent longing. Between Blue and White, the former remains the better films, but this critic remains excited to finish off Kieslowski's filmmaking swan song with Red. 4/5
    Last Five Films I've Seen (Out of 5)

    Earwig (Hadzihalilovic, 2022) 4
    Three Colors: Red (Kieslowski, 1994) 4.5
    Three Colors: White (Kieslowski, 1994) 4
    Bodies Bodies Bodies (Reijn, 2022) 4.5
    Medusa (da Silveira, 2022) 4.5
    The Hidden Fortress (Kurosawa, 1958) 4
    Stagefright (Soavi, 1987) Right between the eyes
    Tropical Malady (Weerasethakul, 2004) 4
    No Holds Barred (Wright, 1989) DOOKIE?!?
    Ready To Rumble (Robbins, 2000) 3
    Groundhog Day (Ramis, 1993) 4.5
    Head (Rafelson, 1968) 4.5
    Nope (Peele, 2022) 4.5
    Happy Together (Kar-wai, 1997) 4
    The Gray Man (Russos, 2022) 2.5
    The Ring (Verbinski, 2002) 4
    Basic Instinct (Verhoeven, 1995) 4.5
    But I'm A Cheerleader (Babbit, 2000) 4.5
    Minions 2: The Rise of Gru (Balda, 2022) 2.5
    Marcel The Shell With Shoes On (Flesicher-Camp, 2022) 5
    The Muppet Movie (Frawley, 1979) 4.5
    Pee Wee's Big Adventure (Burton, 1985) 3.5
    Beba (Huntt, 2022) 4.5

    Fox Force Five News
    Letterboxd

  9. #71934

  10. #71935
    Evil mind, evil sword. Ivan Drago's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    6,991
    Quote Quoting Ivan Drago (view post)
    Two movies into the Three Colors trilogy, here's where I stand so far. From Letterboxd:

    Three Colors: Blue

    Krzysztof Kieślowski‘s first film in the Three Colors trilogy is a visceral and meditative look at grief and the lifelong process of living with it. The sad circumstances that surround Juliette Binoche’s main character are conveyed with beautiful power through shot compositions that simulate her vision blurred by tears and the motif of the color blue taking shape through an object in Julie’s apartment or stylized lighting in a given scene. The symphonic music depicts both the weight of carrying the tragedy of her husband and daughter’s death and her struggle to move forward with unrelenting grandeur, as do Binoche’s facial expressions in her tremendous breakthrough performance. It may take a second viewing to fully comprehend its philosophical ideas, but for the rest of the trilogy, this critic is along for the ride. 4/5

    Three Colors: White

    The concept of Krzysztof Kieślowski's second film in the Three Colors trilogy hasn’t necessarily aged well for some people, but with more time to ponder about the roads taken by downtrodden hairdresser Karol Karol after his wife files for divorce and frames him for burning down her own salon, the more his artistic intention is understood as being centering around romantic and economic equality. Karol loved Dominique so much he was willing to bring her down to his level economically and go incredible lengths to reach her level of twisted affection in order to prove his love for her. It’s a type of romance rarely depicted on screen with so much sympathy for both sides thanks to the tender performances from Zbigniew Zamachowski and Julie Delpy, dry sense of humor as well as the common use of white in the film whether its through motifs like when a bird hilariously sets the tone for Karol's plight, or the tones both characters reflect on their wedding day with silent longing. Between Blue and White, the former remains the better films, but this critic remains excited to finish off Kieslowski's filmmaking swan song with Red. 4/5
    It has now been a week since I saw Three Colors: Red for the first time and it has been difficult to translate my feelings about it into words. The final film in Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Colors trilogy follows a young student named Valentine who despite success as a model, feels her life is empty thanks to the struggles that come with keeping a long-distance relationship afloat. An accident leads her into the life of a retired judge, who spends his days listening in on his neighbors’ phone conversations. Valentine initially feels shock and fear over this man’s invasion of others’ privacy, as anyone else would, but what ensues between the two forges an unlikely friendship, as they ponder to each other the answers to life’s altruistic questions: are we all connected in a metaphysical sense or is our fraternity a mere result of random chance? And how is our connection formed; our mutual passion for something, or the frustration that comes with a given failure? Or is it generally through our humanity, therefore making the answer all of the above? These are thought-provoking questions Kieslowski asks in his final film, but audiences are given time to meditate over them by pacing Red deliberately slow, but that allows the dialogue of his script and the beauty of his images to sear into viewers’ minds, allowing us to ruminate over them for days on end, and that’s before mentioning the stellar performances of Irene Jacob and Jean-Louis Trintignant, as their chemistry cuts through with mesmerizing naturalism. Red is the most dense entry in the Three Colors trilogy, and may require multiple viewings for casuals to wrap their heads around its themes about the philosophy of coincidence, chance, fate, existence and humanity, but the reward is well worth the journey, because it culminates in an ending that’s so incendiary with its power, that it's made me want to watch the entire Three Colors trilogy all over again.
    Last Five Films I've Seen (Out of 5)

    Earwig (Hadzihalilovic, 2022) 4
    Three Colors: Red (Kieslowski, 1994) 4.5
    Three Colors: White (Kieslowski, 1994) 4
    Bodies Bodies Bodies (Reijn, 2022) 4.5
    Medusa (da Silveira, 2022) 4.5
    The Hidden Fortress (Kurosawa, 1958) 4
    Stagefright (Soavi, 1987) Right between the eyes
    Tropical Malady (Weerasethakul, 2004) 4
    No Holds Barred (Wright, 1989) DOOKIE?!?
    Ready To Rumble (Robbins, 2000) 3
    Groundhog Day (Ramis, 1993) 4.5
    Head (Rafelson, 1968) 4.5
    Nope (Peele, 2022) 4.5
    Happy Together (Kar-wai, 1997) 4
    The Gray Man (Russos, 2022) 2.5
    The Ring (Verbinski, 2002) 4
    Basic Instinct (Verhoeven, 1995) 4.5
    But I'm A Cheerleader (Babbit, 2000) 4.5
    Minions 2: The Rise of Gru (Balda, 2022) 2.5
    Marcel The Shell With Shoes On (Flesicher-Camp, 2022) 5
    The Muppet Movie (Frawley, 1979) 4.5
    Pee Wee's Big Adventure (Burton, 1985) 3.5
    Beba (Huntt, 2022) 4.5

    Fox Force Five News
    Letterboxd

  11. #71936
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    9,821
    In lieu of Woody Allen's (possible) retirement, my top 10 by him:

    1. Hanna and her sisters
    2. Annie Hall
    3. Crimes and misdemeanors
    4. Zelig
    5. Broadway Danny Rose
    6. Love and Death
    7. Husbands and wives
    8. Sweet and Lowdown
    9. Vicky Cristina Barcelona
    10. The Purple Rose of Cairo

  12. #71937
    Apparently he's not retiring, he's just not going to make movies anymore.

    I'd say Match Point is probably his most fully realized film, followed by Hannah and Her Sisters and Broadway Danny Rose. Annie Hall, Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex... But Were Afraid to Ask, and "Oedipus Wrecks" from New York Stories are his funniest, and Manhattan is something of a personal favourite although the story and Allen's direction aren't even on speaking terms for much of the film. His most underrated films are probably Manhattan Murder Mystery, Whatever Works, and You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, while Crimes and Misdemeanors is his most over-rated, followed by Husbands and Wives and Midnight in Paris.
    Just because...
    The Banshees of Inisherin (Martin McDonagh, 2022) mild
    Aftersun (Charlotte Wells, 2022) cold
    Limite (Mário Peixoto, 1931) mild

    The last book I read was...
    Movies on Our Minds: The Evolution of Cinematic Engagement by James E. Cutting


    The (New) World

  13. #71938
    collecting tapes Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    16,561
    Match Point is my favorite from him, but admitting I have seen a lot of his work.

  14. #71939
    Producer
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    2,865
    Haven't seen a whole lot, but at the moment:

    1. Manhattan
    2. The Purple Rose of Cairo
    3. Radio Days
    4. Love and Death
    5. Annie Hall
    6. Match Point
    7. "Oedipus Wrecks" (New York Stories)
    8. Crimes and Misdemeanors
    9. Manhattan Murder Mystery
    10. Take the Money and Run
    Midnight Run (1988) - 9
    The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) - 8.5
    The Adventures of Robinhood (1938) - 8
    Sisters (1973) - 6.5
    Shin Godzilla (2016) - 7.5

  15. #71940
    Last Seen:
    The Devils (K. Russell, 1971) ☆
    My Father's Dragon (N. Twomey, 2022) ☆
    Inside Job, S1, Pt. 2 (S. Takeuchi, 2022) ☆
    Patton (F. Schaffner, 1970) ☆
    Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (E. Radomski/B. Timm, 1993)
    Tuca & Bertie, S3 (L. Hanawalt, 2022) ☆
    Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (R. Coogler, 2022) ☆
    The Dragon Prince: The Mystery of Aaravos, Book 4: Earth (A. Ehasz/J. Richmond, 2022) ☆
    All Quiet on the Western Front (E. Berger, 2022) ☆
    Toradora! + SOS + OVA (T. Nagai, 2008–09, 2011) ☆

    First time ☆

  16. #71941

    Dr. Strangelove (Kubrick, '64)



    We'll meet again, don't know where, don't

    know when...


    [
    ]

    Final Score: 10
    .
    Last edited by StuSmallz; 10-03-2022 at 06:51 AM.

  17. #71942
    Cinematographer StanleyK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,414
    Luis Buñuel:



    L'Age d'Or - 4
    Gran Casino - 7
    The Great Madcap - 5.5
    Los Olvidados - 7
    Susana - 5.5
    Daughter of Deceit - 5.5
    Mexican Bus Ride - 5.5
    A Woman without Love - 7
    El Bruto - 7
    El - 5.5
    Illusion Travels by Streetcar - 4
    Robinson Crusoe - 5.5
    Wuthering Heights - 2.5
    The River and Death - 5.5
    The Criminal Life of Archibaldo de la Cruz - 7
    That Is the Dawn - 5.5
    Death in the Garden - 5.5
    Nazarin - 7
    Fever Mounts at El Pao - 5.5
    The Young One - 8.5
    Viridiana - 8.5
    The Exterminating Angel - 8.5
    Diary of a Chambermaid - 7
    Belle de Jour - 8.5
    The Milky Way - 5.5
    Tristana - 7
    The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie - 8.5
    The Phantom of Liberty - 5.5
    That Obscure Object of Desire - 5.5

    Un Chien Andalou - 5.5
    Land Without Bread - 5.5
    Simon of the Desert - 7



    Took a while to really get going, but once he did, he made a few classics.

  18. #71943
    Producer Yxklyx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,156
    Did Todd Solondz ghost-write The Pit (1981)?

    Watched this movie the other day on Shudder and it reminded me a bit of Solondz' movies so I did a little digging around. Ian A Stuart is the credited writer and he's written nothing else other than a documentary a few years earlier and a recent interview related to the 1981 movie. It's a B movie but the script is solid. The dialogue is very realistic and characters are fleshed out even with little screen time. So why would a good writer like this never write again? Now to the story. Apart from the horror aspect, there's a 26 year-old woman babysitting an unrelated 13 year old troubled/sensitive boy (ages approximate). She actually lives alone with him for what looks like an entire week. She gives him a bath, while he's naked of course. He's constantly trying to peak at her nude. The boy is infatuated with the babysitter. He cuts out the photo of a nude woman from a magazine and attaches it to the photo of another woman's head. He makes a prank phone call to make said woman undress. This boy would fit right in any of Solondz' movies. Looking at Solondz' IMDB page he would have been 22 at this time. His first writing/directing credits are from 1984. The kicker is - look at his first two films:

    Feelings - A sensitive youth despairs, as he cannot endure life without his beloved.

    Babysitter - Follows a young male as he recalls the various babysitters of his youth.
    Last edited by Yxklyx; 10-07-2022 at 05:05 PM.

  19. #71944

  20. #71945
    collecting tapes Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    16,561
    I haven't read NCFOM, but I always think of Fight Club when this topic comes up. That was a reaaaaaally close adaptation. The book just had more in between scenes, but I chalk it up to a difference in the mediums. The core was spot on.

  21. #71946
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    9,821
    The Maltese Falcon is pretty faithful, down to the exact dialogue.

  22. #71947
    Producer Yxklyx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,156
    In Jaws, I love that first meteor streak shown when they're on the boat. It puts the struggle of the three men in perspective, their plight is so insignificant in the context of the universe but at the same time it elevates the events to something legendary. The second meteor streak is mildly gratuitous.

    Last edited by Yxklyx; 11-14-2022 at 04:41 PM.

  23. #71948
    The universe is gratuitous.
    Just because...
    The Banshees of Inisherin (Martin McDonagh, 2022) mild
    Aftersun (Charlotte Wells, 2022) cold
    Limite (Mário Peixoto, 1931) mild

    The last book I read was...
    Movies on Our Minds: The Evolution of Cinematic Engagement by James E. Cutting


    The (New) World

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
An forum