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Thread: 28 Film Discussion Threads Later

  1. #71851
    I'm in the milk... Mara's Avatar
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    It's pretty fun! I can't remember who said that Austen names her books after the central problems in the books-- Persuasion, Pride & Prejudice, etc. and the central problem of Emma is... Emma.

    I'm curious if you've seen Clueless. It's a really innovative take on the story in a way that modern updates rarely are.
    ...and the milk's in me.

  2. #71852
    I'm in the milk... Mara's Avatar
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    Also, I came down on pretty much liking the 2020 Emma. with its odd punctuation, even if it couldn't quite decide if it was an adaptation or a deconstruction.

    One of my sisters hated it, though. Like actively despised it.
    ...and the milk's in me.

  3. #71853
    The Pan megladon8's Avatar
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    I have not seen Clueless but I'm very excited to do so, it sounds charming.

    Persuasion is my favorite Austen book, and probably my number 2 book of all time. Wonderful book.

    Jen really wanted to show me Sense & Sensibility last night, but couldn't find it. So Emma was her backup.
    "All right, that's too hot. Anything we can do about that heat?"

    "Rick...it's a flamethrower."

  4. #71854
    Emma 2020 is sumptuous visually, but 90s Emma is funnier and more charming overall if you ask me. The way Gwyneth Paltrow bounces around social situations, putting on a nice face in one breath before talking smack the next, is hugely entertaining. Plus the score is lovely.

  5. #71855
    Producer Yxklyx's Avatar
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    I watched the two Emmas (along with Clueless) recently and I prefer the one with the period. Clueless is just as good as that one. Sense & Sensibility is superior to all three but nothing compares to the 90s miniseries of Pride and Prejudice (though Steadman's performance grates). The recent P&P film is totally forgettable - there was no reason to make that one.

  6. #71856
    I'm in the milk... Mara's Avatar
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    The P&P miniseries is terrific.

    The 1995 film version of Persuasion is really, really good. Maybe my favorite Austen adaptation (and definitely my favorite of her novels.) Netflix has a new Persuasion coming out next month with Dakota Johnson that looks like hot garbage and I am prepared to hate it passionately.
    ...and the milk's in me.

  7. #71857
    I'll read through this later, but for now, I'm just going to leave it here:

    20 of the Most Misunderstood and Misinterpreted Movies Ever Made

  8. #71858

  9. #71859
    Saw Inland Empire for the first time last night, which has me thinking how I often enjoy movies about making movies. I've seen a lot, but I haven't seen them all. I would appreciate any insight you may have into the movies below based on 1) if they're good and 2) how much or how little they are actually about making movies. (Ed Wood is very much about making movies, while Inglourious Basterds is very little about making movies.)

    The Dirties
    Get Shorty
    Saving Mr Banks
    The Bad and the Beautiful
    Hooper
    Hellzapoppin
    Shadow of the Vampire
    Son of Rambow
    Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
    Dolemite Is My Name
    Pain and Glory
    Matinee
    Silent Movie
    Day for Night
    Tristram Shandy
    Wag the Dog
    A Star Is Born

  10. #71860
    Last Seen:​
    A Streetcar Named Desire (E. Kazan, 1951) ☆
    Zodiac (D. Fincher, 2007)
    Heat (M. Mann, 1995)
    Cléo from 5 to 7 (A. Varda, 1962) ☆
    A Woman is a Woman (J. Godard, 1961) ☆
    Last Year at Marienbad (A. Resnais, 1961) ☆
    The Mist (F. Darabont, 2007)
    I Vitelloni (F. Fellini, 1953) ☆
    Rome, Open City (R. Rossellini, 1945) ☆
    RRR (S. S. Rajamouli, 2022) ☆

    First time ☆

  11. #71861
    Bark! Go away Russ's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting Idioteque Stalker (view post)
    Saw Inland Empire for the first time last night, which has me thinking how I often enjoy movies about making movies. I've seen a lot, but I haven't seen them all. I would appreciate any insight you may have into the movies below based on 1) if they're good and 2) how much or how little they are actually about making movies. (Ed Wood is very much about making movies, while Inglourious Basterds is very little about making movies.)

    The Dirties
    Get Shorty
    Saving Mr Banks
    The Bad and the Beautiful
    Hooper
    Hellzapoppin
    Shadow of the Vampire
    Son of Rambow
    Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
    Dolemite Is My Name
    Pain and Glory
    Matinee
    Silent Movie
    Day for Night
    Tristram Shandy
    Wag the Dog
    A Star Is Born
    I think the most obvious omission is Richard Rush's 1980 film The Stunt Man (one of my favorites).

    Great call on Hellzapoppin and Matinee (two more of my favorites).

    I would be remiss if I didn't at least mention two candidates (two low budget meta films that draw attention to themselves for all the right reasons):

    Raiders of the Lost Ark: The Adaptation - ("a 1989 American fan film, made as a shot-for-shot remake of the 1981 Indiana Jones adventure film Raiders of the Lost Ark. Using the original film's screenplay and score, it principally starred and was filmed, directed, and produced over a seven-year period by three Mississippi teenagers (Chris Strompolos, Eric Zala, and Jayson Lamb).")

    And especially this one...

    Flooding With Love For the Kid (2007) - Based on the novel First Blood, here's a succinct summarization of Zachary Oberzan's film...

    Zack Oberzan was a 33-year-old “failed actor,” in his words, when he decided to make a Rambo movie.

    In his 220-square-foot apartment.

    For $96 dollars.

    With one camera and one mic.

    Playing all 26 roles himself.


    I highly recommend Flooding with Love For the Kid

    As for releases of late, I think Nobuhiko Ôbayashi's (Hausu) final film, Labyrinth of Cinema (2019) may be just what you're looking for. I have the blu-ray, but haven't watched it yet. I'll try to watch it soon and report back.
    Last edited by Russ; 05-08-2022 at 08:18 PM.
    "We eventually managed to find them near Biskupin, where demonstrations of prehistoric farming are organized. These oxen couldn't be transported to anywhere else, so we had to built the entire studio around them. A scene that lasted twenty-something seconds took us a year and a half to prepare."

  12. #71862
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    Quote Quoting Russ (view post)
    I think the most obvious omission is Richard Rush's 1980 film The Stunt Man (one of my favorites).
    ^ Double this.

    (GREAT TO SEE YOU RUSS!!! )

  13. #71863
    Quote Quoting Russ (view post)
    I think the most obvious omission is Richard Rush's 1980 film The Stunt Man (one of my favorites).
    The Stunt Man is a great suggestion that I've already seen. Exactly the type of thing I'm looking for. The other three may not be precisely what I thought I wanted, but I'm glad to have found them nonetheless. Definitely off my radar. Flooding with Love for the Kid has been watchlisted. Thanks Russ.

    Other than that, the ones I am most drawn to at the moment are Hellzapoppin, Tristram Shandy, and Shadow of the Vampire.

  14. #71864

  15. #71865
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
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    Whoa hey Russ long time no see.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

  16. #71866

  17. #71867
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
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    I liked The Quick and the Dead a lot more on a final and recent viewing. However the last act still bugs me a bit. Feels like the movie wanted to have a cake that they set on fire yet they're still gonna eat it anyways. The premise is definitely still very unique however which is good.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

  18. #71868
    Uh-oh. I'm starting to feel the pull of Hong Sang-soo. Seems like a pretty deep rabbit hole...

  19. #71869
    The Pan megladon8's Avatar
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    Enjoyed A Streetcar Named Desire quite a bit.
    "All right, that's too hot. Anything we can do about that heat?"

    "Rick...it's a flamethrower."

  20. #71870
    Cinematographer StanleyK's Avatar
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    Luis Buñuel's The Young One is an underseen gem. It's the first movie I've seen in a while where I was genuinely gripped and curious where the story was going. Very racy stuff for 1960.

  21. #71871
    The Pan megladon8's Avatar
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    Really liked Billy Wilder's Sabrina. Lovely story and performances, but I was most surprised by how visually impeccable it was. I didn't expect that.
    "All right, that's too hot. Anything we can do about that heat?"

    "Rick...it's a flamethrower."

  22. #71872
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Really liked Billy Wilder's Sabrina. Lovely story and performances, but I was most surprised by how visually impeccable it was. I didn't expect that.
    That's a really nice movie. Not one of Wilder's best but still a lot of fun and well made.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

  23. #71873
    Producer Yxklyx's Avatar
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    Huh, didn't realize that Mike D'Angelo a rather popular critic/reviewer who I follow is color-blind (from his Color Out of Space review).

  24. #71874
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Really liked Billy Wilder's Sabrina. Lovely story and performances, but I was most surprised by how visually impeccable it was. I didn't expect that.
    Wilder doesn't get enough credit as a visuals director solely because of his subdued style, but he has crafted some of the most memorable images from old Hollywood.

  25. #71875
    Can't stop won't stop DFA1979's Avatar
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    Quote Quoting Yxklyx (view post)
    Huh, didn't realize that Mike D'Angelo a rather popular critic/reviewer who I follow is color-blind (from his Color Out of Space review).
    That is interesting. I believe I recall him being one of the good ones critics wise.
    Blog!

    It's a luscious mix of words and tricks
    That let us bet when you know we should fold
    On rocks I dreamt of where we'd stepped
    And of the whole mess of roads we're now on

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