Page 2713 of 2724 FirstFirst ... 17132213261326632703271127122713271427152723 ... LastLast
Results 67,801 to 67,825 of 68081

Thread: 28 Film Discussion Threads Later

  1. #67801
    Cinematographer StanleyK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,285
    Quote Quoting StanleyK (view post)
    Today I watched it again and I felt it's pretty good. Go figure.
    I was hoping for a repeat of that today when I rewatched Mike Leigh's Naked. Alas, I still find it fucking terrible, which is a shame since I liked High Hopes and loved Life is Sweet.

  2. #67802
    CHUDs Assemble MadMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A land of corn and technology
    Posts
    18,887
    Quote Quoting megladon8 (view post)
    Finally saw Interstellar.

    Liked it a lot.
    I love that movie, so much. I saw it at my local cheap theater. I also may have cried a few times. I am not sure when I will see it again, due to its length and my desire to go for mostly first time viewings these days.

  3. #67803
    CHUDs Assemble MadMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A land of corn and technology
    Posts
    18,887
    Killing Zoe is kind of dumb, but I still liked it anyways. Imagine the thieves from Reservoir Dogs or Heat, only they are complete idiots. Eric Stoltz was once a major film actor, and he actually carries this film pretty well. I wish they had given Julie Delpy more to do, also. I would love to visit Paris one day. I chuckled at the "Does this mean our friendship is in trouble?" line.

  4. #67804
    Cinematographer Idioteque Stalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,053
    Today I watched all the trailers for Oscar buzz movies according to gold derby, and I must say the year as a whole looks excruciatingly dull.

  5. #67805
    Moderator TGM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    3,260
    And cross posting here as well. Here's that Ninja Kat film I had mentioned before. Really pleased by how this one turned out personally, and I'd of course love if you all would check it out and let me know what you all think as well.


  6. #67806
    The Pan Spinal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    19,670
    BBC's top 100 foreign language films

    [
    ]
    Last edited by Spinal; 10-31-2018 at 11:37 PM.
    The Beach Bum (Korine, 2019) *1/2
    Us (Peele, 2019) ***1/2
    Fugue (Smoczynska, 2018) ***1/2
    Prisoners (Villeneuve, 2013) ***1/2
    Shadow (Zhang, 2018) ***
    Oslo, August 31st (J. Trier, 2011) ****
    Climax (Noé, 2018) **1/2
    Fighting With My Family (Merchant, 2019) **
    Upstream Color (Carruth, 2013) ***
    The Forbidden Room (Maddin/Johnson, 2015) ***1/2

  7. #67807
    Winston* Classic Winston*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wellington
    Posts
    8,229
    Do silent films count as foreign language films?

  8. #67808
    That's not a very impressive list. It's not awful, but it's a mix of predictable and unpredictably populist which is not interesting to look at and most easily forgotten.

  9. #67809
    Quote Quoting Spinal (view post)
    BBC's top 100 foreign language films

    98. In the Heat of the Sun (Jiang Wen, 1994)
    59. Come and See (Elem Klimov, 1985)
    54. Eat Drink Man Woman (Ang Lee, 1994)
    38. A Brighter Summer Day (Edward Yang, 1991)
    26. Cinema Paradiso (Giuseppe Tornatore, 1988)
    These are the only films on the list I haven't seen, although I've heard of all of them and own copies of both the Jiang and Klimov films. I've also been meaning to see the Yang for ages, but have little to no desire to see the Lee or the Tornatore. At least some the individual ballots are interesting, notably Shigehiko Hasumi putting Naruse's little-known Tsuruhachi Tsurujiro third on his top ten. (North American critics tend to have less interesting lists simply because it's less likely they'll include something I'm unfamiliar with.)
    Just because...
    Tokyo Drifter (Suzuki Seijun, 1966) mild
    Mr. Jealousy (Noah Baumbach, 1998) warm
    Anomalisa (Charlie Kaufman/Duke Johnson, 2015) warm

    The last book I read was...
    The Birth of Tragedy, or: Hellenism and Pessimism by Friedrich Nietzsche


    The (New) World

  10. #67810
    Cinematographer Idioteque Stalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,053
    Quote Quoting baby doll (view post)
    These are the only films on the list I haven't seen, although I've heard of all of them and own copies of both the Jiang and Klimov films.
    Come and See is amazing.

  11. #67811
    The Pan Spinal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Portland
    Posts
    19,670
    100. Landscape in the Mist (Theo Angelopoulos, 1988)
    99. Ashes and Diamonds (Andrzej Wajda, 1958)
    98. In the Heat of the Sun (Jiang Wen, 1994)
    95. Floating Clouds (Mikio Naruse, 1955)
    94. Where Is the Friend's Home? (Abbas Kiarostami, 1987)
    88. The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1939)
    74. Pierrot Le Fou (Jean-Luc Godard, 1965)
    70. L’Eclisse (Michelangelo Antonioni, 1962)
    69. Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)
    65. Ordet (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1955)
    63. Spring in a Small Town (Fei Mu, 1948)
    62. Touki Bouki (Djibril Diop Mambéty, 1973)
    61. Sansho the Bailiff (Kenji Mizoguchi, 1954)
    54. Eat Drink Man Woman (Ang Lee, 1994)
    53. Late Spring (Yasujirô Ozu, 1949)
    47. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
    39. Close-Up (Abbas Kiarostami, 1990)
    38. A Brighter Summer Day (Edward Yang, 1991)
    35. The Leopard (Luchino Visconti, 1963)
    32. All About My Mother (Pedro Almodóvar, 1999)
    27. The Spirit of the Beehive (Victor Erice, 1973)
    21. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
    18. A City of Sadness (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 1989)
    14. Jeanne Dielman, 23 Commerce Quay, 1080 Brussels (Chantal Akerman, 1975)
    12. Farewell My Concubine (Chen Kaige, 1993)

    Quite a few I haven't seen (25). I've been meaning to see Ordet and L'Eclisse for about a decade now. Amour is somehow the only Haneke feature I haven't seen (excluding the TV stuff). Every time I see The Spirit of the Beehive or A Separation, I think, oh, I want to see that, but never do. Kiarstomi and Hou hold little appeal to me. If I were to sit down and watch one right now, it would be A Brighter Summer Day.
    The Beach Bum (Korine, 2019) *1/2
    Us (Peele, 2019) ***1/2
    Fugue (Smoczynska, 2018) ***1/2
    Prisoners (Villeneuve, 2013) ***1/2
    Shadow (Zhang, 2018) ***
    Oslo, August 31st (J. Trier, 2011) ****
    Climax (Noé, 2018) **1/2
    Fighting With My Family (Merchant, 2019) **
    Upstream Color (Carruth, 2013) ***
    The Forbidden Room (Maddin/Johnson, 2015) ***1/2

  12. #67812
    Cinematographer Idioteque Stalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,053
    Ordet is an all-timer for me. L'Eclisse is good but not close to its level.

  13. #67813
    Quote Quoting PURPLE (view post)
    That's not a very impressive list. It's not awful, but it's a mix of predictable and unpredictably populist which is not interesting to look at and most easily forgotten.
    It's a list I would expect a data mining algorithm to come up with.
    Last 10 Movies Seen
    (90+ = canonical, 80-89 = brilliant, 70-79 = strongly recommended, 60-69 = good, 50-59 = mixed, 40-49 = below average with some good points, 30-39 = poor, 20-29 = bad, 10-19 = terrible, 0-9 = soul-crushingly inept in every way)

    Like Someone in Love
    (2012) 56
    Timbuktu
    (2014
    ) 62
    The Changeling (1980) 65
    The Standoff at Sparrow Creek (2019) 59
    Ida
    (2013) 65
    Nocturama (2016) 68

    Along With the Gods: The Last 49 Days
    (2018) 45

    The Guns of Navarone
    (1961) 71
    Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse (2018) 65
    A Simple Favor (2018) 47

    Stuff at Letterboxd
    Listening Habits at LastFM

  14. #67814
    Cinematographer
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,350
    Thanks to Thai Netflix I cleared up a couple of 80s classics:

    Police Story (1985)

    Worried early on with the rather standard shootout (although it contains a nice humanizing beat from one very panicked cop), but that feeling is all but eclipsed with the sight of cars careening down and destroying the shack town in spectacular fashion, both in wide shot and close-up, and by the time Jackie Chan is swinging around that bus I've come fully onboard. Humor is much more hit and miss, but energetic and crafted with enough emphasis on choreography to be at least diverting, such as Chan juggling multiple phone calls or Maggie Cheung trying to ride away on motorcycle. Overall police story, though only serviceable, is lively and engaging on a scene-by-scene basis (the court scene, with the exception of Chan's tape, plays out much more seriously than I expect). There's an intriguing throughline of police class anger too, which manifests most clearly in Chan's rant at the superintendent, but is also peppered throughout and informs some plot points: one aside about inspector pay rate, the main motivation for rampant police corruption, etc. 7.5/10

    The Blues Brothers (1980)


    By all means, this shouldn't have worked -- sloppy storytelling, shapeless comedy, excessive blockbuster mode -- but the whole thing is enveloped in such a strong aura of otherworldly cool that it overpowers those and delivers a grand good time. Even the weakest aspect, chase scenes running a tad too long, is infused with the charm of a light, devil-may-care attitude among those spectacular stunts. In fact, this feels like a most unique, weirdly self-contradictory blockbuster: both glib and sincere, deadpan and over-the-top (the brothers shrugging off wreckage is comedy gold every time), improvisational in spirit yet expensively, meticulously crafted. Not sure if this infectious alchemy has ever been duplicated again; it might just have been all the right people with all those drugs on set. 8/10
    Midnight Run (1988) - 9
    The Smiling Lieutenant (1931) - 8.5
    The Adventures of Robinhood (1938) - 8
    Sisters (1973) - 6.5
    Shin Godzilla (2016) - 7.5

  15. #67815
    Moderator Dead & Messed Up's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New Canaan, where to the shepherd come the sheep.
    Posts
    10,521
    Theory: Zemeckis' Forrest Gump is 12th on the IMDB Top 250, but Who Framed Roger Rabbit? is not only substantially better; it's also a more fascinating look at U.S. history, specifically issues of ghettoization and gentrification/capitalism, probably because those subjects feel background given the absurdist context (even though the entire story pivots on emergent freeway development).

  16. #67816
    CHUDs Assemble MadMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A land of corn and technology
    Posts
    18,887
    Oh yeah Roger Rabbit is better. Not even really close, and I love Forrest Gump.

  17. #67817
    CHUDs Assemble MadMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A land of corn and technology
    Posts
    18,887
    The Wraith (1986) is cheesy as hell, rips off numerous better movies and like many 1980s films is really dated. Still I rather enjoyed a movie featuring an indestructible badass car driven by the alien ghost of a girl's dead boyfriend. There is a strange quality here that elevates the material, and I liked the cast. Also the film makes part of Arizona look and feel as if its survived the apocalypse as is, although perhaps that is the way the state looks.

  18. #67818
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    11,620
    Love The Wraith. Supposedly Sheen got cast in Platoon and had to skip most of the filming of The Wraith, which is why it was a different actor to start and he wears a helmet most of the time. The Wraith is deliciously bonkers and has one of the best explosions/explosion reactions ever (the barn blowing up/Clint Howard).

  19. #67819
    Moderator Dead & Messed Up's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New Canaan, where to the shepherd come the sheep.
    Posts
    10,521
    Full Metal Jacket - Um... fine? I'm sure it's not a popular take that the first third of the film is better than the last two-thirds, but there's a forcefulness and focus in the training sequences that's missing in the back portions, where it sprawls out into slice-of-life cul-de-sacs of the Vietnam conflict. I'm thinking a lot about just how thudding it was when Joker talked about the "duality of man," and whether or not the film believes that, and if there's meaning in the film splitting off into two distinct films. The only thing I can think is that the first part shows us how men can be crushed down into animalistic robots (their descending from the bunkers to attack Pyle with soap bludgeons looks like the apes sneaking toward their enemies in 2001), and the second half shows us the conclusion of that mentality: a self-created apocalyptic wasteland. Where all there is to do is wait around, buy the occasional sex (because there's no room for women in this exclusively male universe, only "pussy"), and murder each other. The film also draws a connection between Pyle and the VC sniper at the end; Hartman points out that a sniper in a tower was a former Marine, and we're meant to draw a link between that sniper in a tower and this sniper in a tower, no doubt similarly indoctrinated and abused by a monolithic system like Pyle was. That takes this film back to a general "loss of innocence" ambivalence that we get in Vietnam flicks like Apocalypse Now and Platoon, done better in Apocalypse Now, for sure. Rob Ager has some interesting commentary on the use of sex in the film, but I suspect the larger metaphor is men literally becoming guns, since that's the clue in the title ("jacket" suggesting an anthropomorphization of bullets).

    One of the odder elements here is that we watch Joker go on the same journey twice. In the first segment, he's resistant to the system and tries to operate with consideration, but he's eventually pummeled (through authority and peer pressure) into becoming part of the system. And in the second half, uh... it happens again.

  20. #67820
    CHUDs Assemble MadMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    A land of corn and technology
    Posts
    18,887
    Quote Quoting Skitch (view post)
    Love The Wraith. Supposedly Sheen got cast in Platoon and had to skip most of the filming of The Wraith, which is why it was a different actor to start and he wears a helmet most of the time. The Wraith is deliciously bonkers and has one of the best explosions/explosion reactions ever (the barn blowing up/Clint Howard).
    Oh yeah he did do Platoon at the same time. Sheen was a busy guy in the 1980s. The barn explosion was badass. Poor Clint Howard just wanted to work on cars.

    I love Full Metal Jacket. I think both parts of the film work just fine.

  21. #67821
    A Platypus Grouchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    8,453
    Quote Quoting Dead & Messed Up (view post)
    I'm sure it's not a popular take that the first third of the film is better than the last two-thirds, but there's a forcefulness and focus in the training sequences that's missing in the back portions, where it sprawls out into slice-of-life cul-de-sacs of the Vietnam conflict.
    Actually, this is the predominant take on Full Metal Jacket. Most casual fans love the training sequences and consider the rest of the film as repetitive and slow.

  22. #67822
    Moderator Dead & Messed Up's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New Canaan, where to the shepherd come the sheep.
    Posts
    10,521
    Quote Quoting Grouchy (view post)
    Actually, this is the predominant take on Full Metal Jacket. Most casual fans love the training sequences and consider the rest of the film as repetitive and slow.
    Oh, derp, I worded that wrong, I agree with your point, that the first third would be obviously considered superior to the back two-thirds.

  23. #67823
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    11,620
    DaMU was this your first watch? You review reads that like it is.

    If so, revisit it sometime. I don't disagree with anything you said, really. I felt that way first few watches, then over the years the second half has taken on more weight. That ending singing Mickey Mouse haunts me. It definitely took a few watches for me to appreciate the second half. Apocalypse Now is still the best Vietnam movie, imo, really makes you feel the horror and confusion and insanity of that war.

  24. #67824
    - - - - - Irish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    9,537
    Not sure I fully grokked Damu's analysis. I disagreed here and there with what I understood. Good read, as always, though.

    My main beef with "Full Metal Jacket" is Kubrick's lazy adaptation of the source material ("The Short Timers" by Gustav Hasford).

    - The opening is better because it's a complete story with a discernible beginning, middle, and end, and has a clear point to make. The second half, about the Battle of Hue, isn't as clear. This is because Kubrick and Michael Herr ignored the last third of Hasford's novel. As a result, they made a movie with no ending and a lot of thematic loose ends.

    - I liked the Mickey Mouse song the first time around, but nowadays it just strikes me as gross. It's a cheap attempt at an upbeat ending ("I am alive and I am not afraid," the voiceover says) and it contradicts the mood and the message of the rest of the movie.

    - To me, the most striking part of the "duality of man" bit isn't about anything Joker says or his potential meaning. It's that some old, pogue-bait colonel gives Joker an absurd pep talk, one that sounds ripped off from a high school football coach, while they are both standing in front of a mass grave. "FMJ" is rife with black humor, like when Joker's CO outlines the Tet Offensive and Joker immediately makes a quip about Anne Margaret.

    - To steal from S&E, consider the value system of someone who would praise Lee Harvey Oswald for his markmanship just 5 years after Kennedy's death. That seems to be the biggest point of that scene.

    - I don't think there's a real connection to be made between the killings at the end of the first part and the end of the second. It's just Kubrick reusing a device because he's out of ideas. Both sections use gorey, unjust death as a metaphor for the larger war. Kubrick contrasts strange silence and sudden violence to shock the the audience and make them feel it.

    - Like every other American movie about the war, "FMJ" ignores any real Vietnamese point of view. So I think it's a leap to assume the VC sniper at the end was "indoctrinated and abused by a monolithic system" like Pyle was.

    - Willard from "Apocalypse Now" was presented as a burnout from that movie's first scene, never as an innocent. Because of that movie's source material, it also implicitly says something about imperial power and colonialism, which is absent from both "The Short Timers" and "Full Metal Jacket." (This is a little more evident in Coppola's bloated-but-fascinating "director's cut.")

    - Joker doesn't go on the same journey twice. I don't think he really changes from Parris Island to Hue; he's still the same gangly smart ass throughout the movie, right up until the ending.

    - This is where the source material shines and the movie doesn't. The character uses wry humor and his position as combat correspondent---more observer than soldier---to shield himself from the war. In the book, he doesn't take responsibility for anything that happens around him and he responds to each fresh horror in a ghoulish, mercenary way. The problem is that the book has a payoff to this central problem---how can you witness this world of shit, and participate in it, and retain your humanity? The movie doesn't have any such payoff. It just sorta hangs there and ends.

    - From memory, the women in "FMJ" are street level prostitutes or, at the end, a single sniper. The book has no women in it at all.

    - I don't think there's much to be read in the title. It seems like quick riff on Pyle's line in the bathroom, when he's describing his ammunition. The film's larger point isn't a colorful metaphor but that institutions will reduce your humanity if you let them.
    Matchcut: A vicious snowflake

  25. #67825
    good for health Skitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Neo-Ohio
    Posts
    11,620
    Quote Quoting Irish (view post)
    - I liked the Mickey Mouse song the first time around, but nowadays it just strikes me as gross. It's a cheap attempt at an upbeat ending ("I am alive and I am not afraid," the voiceover says) and it contradicts the mood and the message of the rest of the movie..
    Ooof, I didn't read it that way at all. I thought it was very gross and depressing because they're all just part of the American imperialist/colonist machine. I felt like his "I'm alive and unafraid" line was as though his eyes are open to just how big a problem it is.

    I'm sure it can be ready any way we want it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
An forum