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Dukefrukem
05-08-2019, 05:06 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9APLXM9Ei8

Dukefrukem
05-08-2019, 05:07 PM
LOVE this miniseries so far. My wife and I watched it last night- and she was ready for the second episode. I had to remind her, "this isn't netflix, we have to wait a week for the next episode".

Ezee E
05-08-2019, 09:44 PM
I didn't realize this started. Thanks!

amberlita
05-08-2019, 10:57 PM
LOVE this miniseries so far. My wife and I watched it last night- and she was ready for the second episode. I had to remind her, "this isn't netflix, we have to wait a week for the next episode".

Felt the same - really wanted the next episode right away. You could recommend to her what I did. I read the Wiki page because I wanted to know immediately how this happened (wasn't sure how much they'd get into the science on the show). I don't know much about nuclear energy but it is an extremely well-written wiki page for lay people to understand.

Listened to the podcast that discusses the episode with the writer and it was great too.

Also got about half way through a youtube doc about Fukushima.

I feel properly satiated until next episode. :)

Dukefrukem
05-08-2019, 11:26 PM
Felt the same - really wanted the next episode right away. You could recommend to her what I did. I read the Wiki page because I wanted to know immediately how this happened (wasn't sure how much they'd get into the science on the show). I don't know much about nuclear energy but it is an extremely well-written wiki page for lay people to understand.

Listened to the podcast that discusses the episode with the writer and it was great too.

Also got about half way through a youtube doc about Fukushima.

I feel properly satiated until next episode. :)

OMG we did the same thing. We watched several Chernobyl videos, and a couple on nuclear fission and the Fukushima one! This disaster has always terrified me as a kid- nuclear energy is super crazy to grasp and it's mind boggling that the nuclear engineers at Chernobyl could not quantify why the power plant's core exploded and did not meltdown.

Morris Schæffer
05-09-2019, 10:55 AM
Gonna watch it for sure too. Looks gripping.

Dukefrukem
05-15-2019, 12:08 PM
Good second episode with much more Jared Harris and the intro of Stellan Skarsgard. Loved the opening; indicating the severity of the radiation leak 200 km away, and then of course Harris proving his theory about the core. The episode ending and wife again was left hanging.

Peng
05-16-2019, 04:02 PM
So 5 hours of constantly slow-seeping dread that combines the elemental horror of nuclear radiation with the banality of evil that is bureaucratic power? Cool. (And I mean that sincerely) First hour is like watching a slow-motion car crash, while the second one ups the stakes foreboding horror at every turn with its potential consequence that keeps widening. Can't wait for the next one.

Dukefrukem
05-24-2019, 06:34 PM
As expected, the fear kinda dropped off in the third episode. Was hoping they would find a way to keep it consistent with the first two episodes. Those miners are a hoot.

Peng
05-25-2019, 02:58 PM
I dunno, the pace does slow down, but understandably so to let us linger in the many consequences and increasingly paranoid atmospehre. And those consequences, especially in the hospital scenes, are horrific and sobering in details enough to stand with the first two episodes' rush of dealing with the immediate aftermaths. The make-up and prosthetics of radiation's brutal effects on the bodies...no word. And that last scene just gutted me.

Also, I thought for a good minute that the minister of coal was played by Ben Mendelsohn.

Peng
05-27-2019, 03:13 AM
1132029943297265664

Slava Malamud, a Russian reporter, has some interesting thoughts to share on the show’s verisimilitude. If anyone doesn’t want to read a twitter thread, here:



I have just finished watching Episode 1 of Chernobyl on @HBO. My perspective is that of someone born and raised in the Soviet Union who has vivid memories of 1986, the catastrophe itself and how it was handled by the Soviet politicians and the state media.


First of all, it is almost inconceivable that a Western TV show would go to this amount of detail authentically portraying Soviet life in that era, knowing full well that its target audience (Western viewers) would never appreciate the effort or indeed even understand it. Trust me, I try very hard to find inaccuracies, however minor. The Americans, a show with similar fetish-like obsession with authenticity, had plenty of small and big Soviet errata to be entertained with. Improperly fastened military shoulder bars, that sort of thing... Not here.


Everything, and I mean everything so far has been incredibly authentic. The typical provincial babushkas talking outside, the kitchen supplies and utensils, the white "celebratory" uniforms of school children (the tragedy occurred just before May Day), the shoes, the hair. Even the little buckets used by Soviet citizens to take out the trash. They even found that crap somewhere! But I'm impressed by much more than the mere minutiae of Soviet everyday life. Yes, in this regard, Chernobyl is much more true to life than any Western show about Russia..


But, what is more impressive, is the characters, their actions, their thoughts, their motivation. The deep, ruthless drilling of the Soviet mind, what governed us, drove us and shackled us. Chernobyl pulls no punches and lays it all bare. And this is really the key to its magic, for me at least. Not only is Chernobyl more realistic than any Western show/film about Russia, it's more realistic than anything Russians would have ever made about themselves, at least on this topic. I am not hyperbolizing. Not at all.


In fact, there have been several Russian films about Chernobyl, and only one, made in 1990, during final stages of Perestroika, does justice to the sheer brutality of this deplorable event. And even this one is more about a hero struggling against the odds, a melodramatic trope. As for the more modern product, there is a film about heroic KGB agents trying to stop a CIA saboteur, for example. Modern Russian cinema, unable to unshackle itself from political expediencies and the "glory of the Motherland", could never make a drama like this one. As an aside, I am particularly happy about the decision to have the characters speak normal British English, not mangled Russian or English with a corny "Russian" accent. Poor Matthew Rhys and Kerry Russel... Their tortured attempts to speak Russian almost ruined The Americans...


In conclusion, yes, the nit-picky Russian viewer in me was utterly satisfied. The initial "Wait a minute, why are kids going to school on a Saturday?" response quickly gave way to "Shit, that's right! We didn't switch to the 5-day week until 1989!" Pure delight, I tell ya. But, far more importantly, the intellectual honesty in how the show treats an extremely traumatic event is more than impressive. It's important. Knowing how many fans HBO has in Russia, my hope is that it will elicit more than just knee-jerk defensive responses. Also, my 17 year old son watched with me, and his first reaction was to immediately dive into the Google rabbit holes trying to research as much as possible about Chernobyl. I don't know about you, but to me this is as good a testimony of the shows greatness as anything


I have just finished a thread where I review Episode 2, scene by scene, if anyone is interested.


Now I’m off to read his views on the other two episodes.

Dukefrukem
05-27-2019, 12:05 PM
Oh damn. That's some great insight.

[ETM]
05-28-2019, 09:35 PM
From my experience, this is only the third "western" portrayal of Soviet Union that's anywhere close to reality, the others being the amazing "Citizen X" (which I feel would be a nice companion piece for Chernobyl) and "Enemy at the Gates".

Sent from my Mi A1 using Tapatalk

Dukefrukem
05-29-2019, 12:54 PM
Good 4th episode. I wasn't sure how they were going to handle the birth of the firefighter's child, so I was preparing for the worst type of hospital scene imaginable. I was a little bit relieved (and disappointed) when it was handled off screen. I didn't like the introduction to a new character in the 4th episode; it would have been nice if there were able to string someone along from episode one to handle that part of the story.

Peng
05-30-2019, 02:20 PM
I feel they're trying to aim for some realism, and to have many clearly divided-by-task groups a throughline of one person might be breaking that a bit. I think it's fine we keep encountering new people so we have a rotating fresh perspective for every aspect of this story. That they cast a semi-recognizable face might be the creators feeling the same as you though (Didn't know Barry Keoghan is going to be in this).

Very harrowing episode. That truck full of dead pets is a real gut punch every time...

Dukefrukem
05-30-2019, 02:37 PM
Yeh, my wife had a hard time with the pet scenes. I tried to explain to her that they would all die horrible deaths if not continue to contaminate innocent people if they weren't put out of their misery.

Dukefrukem
06-04-2019, 04:02 PM
Some pretty great footage that's represented in this series.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfDa8tR25dk

Peng
06-04-2019, 04:18 PM
Great finale, and the ending montage kinda broke me.

Dukefrukem
06-05-2019, 01:44 AM
Great finale, and the ending montage kinda broke me.

Yeh that was well done. I loved the court scene; Harris turns slowly around to the room and realizes what he said.

Peng
06-07-2019, 08:01 AM
lmao that Russian reporter in his twitter thread, and so many other Russian commentators, were dead on about how it will be portrayed from the other side.

1136714938335092737

Dukefrukem
06-07-2019, 01:27 PM
I would watch that too!

dreamdead
06-11-2019, 08:48 PM
Like the others here, we watched and listened to each podcast explaining the changes. It kinda takes away from the courtroom scene, but it remains a likely expedient (and surely narrative) switch. I liked Mazin talking about how he and the director never wanted to seem gleeful at showing the bodies decaying and dying, but I almost wish there had been just a little more in that episode.

Otherwise, it's a series that makes its argument about the necessity of not telling small lies lest those lies be used as the foundation for greater lies. In that regard, it succeeds most wonderfully. Strong stuff.

Morris Schæffer
06-15-2019, 02:23 PM
Seen eps 1 and 2. Exceptional.

Ezee E
06-16-2019, 02:08 AM
1-3 is a political horror movie that I can't really compare to any movie out there. It's exceptional. Looking forward to the rest.

Ivan Drago
01-07-2020, 05:59 AM
1-3 is a political horror movie that I can't really compare to any movie out there. It's exceptional. Looking forward to the rest.

I constantly have the foreboding feeling in my gut that everyone in this show will die horribly. The atmosphere on display is made more haunting by the fact this actually happened.

I'm just starting the fourth episode now. This is harrowing, but remarkable stuff.

Dukefrukem
01-07-2020, 01:52 PM
Agreed. So well executed.

[ETM]
01-07-2020, 09:50 PM
I dressed up as Dyatlov for our office New Year party. Built a Geiger counter from scrap, with lights and sound, stuck at 3.6 roentgen per hour of course.

Sent from my Mi 9 Lite using Tapatalk

Ivan Drago
01-10-2020, 04:52 PM
Forgive the redundancies when my comments from earlier show up here, but I finished this last night, and I can confirm this is better than most of the movies to come out in 2019. It creatively builds suspense through a sound design made from overpowering sound effects, and the ominous drones from its musical score, meanwhile, shadowy cinematography gives the series a bleak and terrifying look. I’ve never watched anything, let alone a miniseries, succeed in informing its audience about the science behind its heady subject matter in a way that’s straightforward and palatable as it builds the persistent, haunting feeling that everyone involved in this tragedy will die a horrible death. I’m left helpless when reminded this disaster actually happened, and this miniseries about it serves as a cautionary, harrowing tale about the delusions of power, the dangers of lies, and the consequences both wreak. It’s a tough watch, but a remarkable achievement from all involved.

Dukefrukem
01-10-2020, 05:38 PM
Yeh the toughest thing to watch was the animal episode.

But that final courtroom scene. Just brilliant.

megladon8
05-22-2020, 05:15 PM
I loved this, until I read about how almost offensively inaccurate it was in portraying so much violence and friction that just wasn't there.

That aspect of it felt like it should have been released in the 80s, when America was still scared of Big Bad Russia.

Production and acting wise it's stellar stuff. And it was certainly gripping.

I mean, I loved watching it. I was just disappointed in the creators for perpetuating such a backwards view of Russian society.

Lazlo
05-22-2020, 05:21 PM
I loved this, until I read about how almost offensively inaccurate it was in portraying so much violence and friction that just wasn't there.

That aspect of it felt like it should have been released in the 80s, when America was still scared of Big Bad Russia.

Production and acting wise it's stellar stuff. And it was certainly gripping.

I mean, I loved watching it. I was just disappointed in the creators for perpetuating such a backwards view of Russian society.

Curious as to what you read that's claiming inaccuracy and what the points of contention were. I recall it being praised for its accuracy. Yes, some characters are composites of multiple real-life people and some were placed in scenes where the real person wouldn't have been, but the overall vibe and narrative of the thing seems to have been pretty spot-on.

I don't think it's any kind of jingoistic anti-Russia thing. More than anything it's about modern-day America in its "What is the cost of lies?" thesis, and even prescient regarding the response to the pandemic in many countries.

Ezee E
05-22-2020, 05:53 PM
Curious as to what you read that's claiming inaccuracy and what the points of contention were. I recall it being praised for its accuracy. Yes, some characters are composites of multiple real-life people and some were placed in scenes where the real person wouldn't have been, but the overall vibe and narrative of the thing seems to have been pretty spot-on.

I don't think it's any kind of jingoistic anti-Russia thing. More than anything it's about modern-day America in its "What is the cost of lies?" thesis, and even prescient regarding the response to the pandemic in many countries.

Chernobyl Inaccuracies (https://culturacolectiva.com/movies/8-historical-inaccuracies-in-hbo-chernobyl)

You pretty much nailed it. As one that enjoys trying to figure out what's true, not true in these type of biopics, nothing came as a big surprise.

Dukefrukem
05-22-2020, 06:14 PM
Chernobyl Inaccuracies (https://culturacolectiva.com/movies/8-historical-inaccuracies-in-hbo-chernobyl)

You pretty much nailed it. As one that enjoys trying to figure out what's true, not true in these type of biopics, nothing came as a big surprise.

I mean, I think most of those are understood and the whole point the show was trying to do was condense all of the events into a shorter time-frame. It makes for excellent drama. And it was definitely stated at the end of the series that Emily Watson's character was a representation of several dozen scientists. Which would be impossible, if not severely boring, to depict on screen.

megladon8
05-22-2020, 06:29 PM
From an article in The New Yorker... (https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/what-hbos-chernobyl-got-right-and-what-it-got-terribly-wrong)


"Unfortunately, apart from these striking moments, the series often veers between caricature and folly. In Episode 2, for example, the Central Committee member Boris Shcherbina (Stellan Skarsgård) threatens to have Legasov shot if he doesn’t tell him how a nuclear reactor works. There are a lot of people throughout the series who appear to act out of fear of being shot. This is inaccurate: summary executions, or even delayed executions on orders of a single apparatchik, were not a feature of Soviet life after the nineteen-thirties. By and large, Soviet people did what they were told without being threatened with guns or any punishment.

Similarly repetitive and ridiculous are the many scenes of heroic scientists confronting intransigent bureaucrats by explicitly criticizing the Soviet system of decision-making. In Episode 3, for example, Legasov asks, rhetorically, “Forgive me—maybe I’ve just spent too much time in my lab, or maybe I’m just stupid. Is this really the way it all works? An uninformed, arbitrary decision that will cost who knows how many lives that is made by some apparatchik, some career Party man?” Yes, of course this is the way it works, and, no, he hasn’t been in his lab so long that he didn’t realize that this is how it works..."

Ezee E
05-22-2020, 06:35 PM
I mean, I think most of those are understood and the whole point the show was trying to do was condense all of the events into a shorter time-frame. It makes for excellent drama. And it was definitely stated at the end of the series that Emily Watson's character was a representation of several dozen scientists. Which would be impossible, if not severely boring, to depict on screen.

Completely agree.

It's not like Black Klansman that completely adjusts time zones and makes up conflicts in order to fit the intended theme.

Lazlo
05-22-2020, 08:10 PM
From an article in The New Yorker... (https://www.newyorker.com/news/our-columnists/what-hbos-chernobyl-got-right-and-what-it-got-terribly-wrong)


"Unfortunately, apart from these striking moments, the series often veers between caricature and folly. In Episode 2, for example, the Central Committee member Boris Shcherbina (Stellan Skarsgård) threatens to have Legasov shot if he doesn’t tell him how a nuclear reactor works. There are a lot of people throughout the series who appear to act out of fear of being shot. This is inaccurate: summary executions, or even delayed executions on orders of a single apparatchik, were not a feature of Soviet life after the nineteen-thirties. By and large, Soviet people did what they were told without being threatened with guns or any punishment.

Similarly repetitive and ridiculous are the many scenes of heroic scientists confronting intransigent bureaucrats by explicitly criticizing the Soviet system of decision-making. In Episode 3, for example, Legasov asks, rhetorically, “Forgive me—maybe I’ve just spent too much time in my lab, or maybe I’m just stupid. Is this really the way it all works? An uninformed, arbitrary decision that will cost who knows how many lives that is made by some apparatchik, some career Party man?” Yes, of course this is the way it works, and, no, he hasn’t been in his lab so long that he didn’t realize that this is how it works..."

Yeah, I dunno if that rises to the level of "offensively inaccurate." It's dramatic license and shorthand, but it's not like they got the broad strokes (and even very many of the details) so wrong as, to me at least, to be anything that ought to gravely detract from appreciation of the thing.

megladon8
05-23-2020, 07:30 PM
I have to express how much I loved not hearing a single cheesy, overdone Russian accent in the whole show.

Everyone spoke more or less the way they normally do, regardless of natural accent. Stellan made his voice a little rougher, but didn't change his accent.

I find poorly done accents 10000000000 times more distracting than just letting the actors speak normally.

Lazlo
05-23-2020, 07:57 PM
I have to express how much I loved not hearing a single cheesy, overdone Russian accent in the whole show.

Everyone spoke more or less the way they normally do, regardless of natural accent. Stellan made his voice a little rougher, but didn't change his accent.

I find poorly done accents 10000000000 times more distracting than just letting the actors speak normally.

I'm a billion-percent with you on this. It's always preferable this way.

Always blew my mind that people complained there weren't German accents in Valkyrie. No chance it would have worked.

megladon8
05-23-2020, 10:28 PM
I'm a billion-percent with you on this. It's always preferable this way.

Always blew my mind that people complained there weren't German accents in Valkyrie. No chance it would have worked.

Part of me is morbidly curious to see a theatrically released film with Tom Cruise aping a German accent.

Ezee E
05-24-2020, 02:02 AM
If TOm Cruise was asked to do one, he would've time traveled to 1942 for fun.

[ETM]
05-24-2020, 08:42 AM
Didn't Valkyrie do a Red October switch, where everyone spoke German until we kinda "flipped" to English in a specific moment? It's natural that they wouldn't have an accent, I prefer that approach.

Lazlo
05-24-2020, 01:57 PM
;621035']Didn't Valkyrie do a Red October switch, where everyone spoke German until we kinda "flipped" to English in a specific moment? It's natural that they wouldn't have an accent, I prefer that approach.

Yeah it starts with Cruise writing in a journal and it's read in German on the voice over. Can't remember how the switch exactly goes down, though I'm sure it isn't as elegant as Red October.