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View Full Version : Big Hero 6 (Don Hall, Chris Williams)



Watashi
11-13-2014, 09:01 AM
http://static.squarespace.com/static/51b3dc8ee4b051b96ceb10de/t/54330704e4b09a386a2a5c9a/1412630277140/

Watashi
11-13-2014, 09:03 AM
Cool film, but man, its story is practically The Iron Giant beat for beat.

Your kids will want a Baymax the moment the film is over.

Fezzik
11-13-2014, 01:53 PM
Cool film, but man, its story is practically The Iron Giant beat for beat.

Your kids will want a Baymax the moment the film is over.

Kids? Hell, I wanted a Baymax when it was over.

I agree its very Iron-Giantish, but its lush, fun and its got a GREAT message.

One of my favorite reviews noted that during the film, the reviewer's 12 year old son leaned over and whispered "Dad, I want to go to college" - I love that. It turned scientists and inventors into true heros. It may be overblown to say, but it could inspire kids to WANT to learn / think / create.

And that's good.

Also, the short in front of it, 'Feast,' was charming as hell. A story of love between a pet and his owner, wrapped in the idea food as a bonding experience.

Its like they made it for me :)

Philip J. Fry
11-19-2014, 06:35 AM
Cool film, but man, its story is practically The Iron Giant beat for beat.

Your kids will want a Baymax the moment the film is over.A more action-packed Iron Giant, yeah, but if you're gonna rip-off something, you could do a lot worse than IG. Rip off or not, I loved the movie.

And Feast was great too!

Spun Lepton
12-05-2014, 03:50 PM
Light and easy to digest. Tight pacing, good characters (if a little stereotypical at times), gorgeous visuals, lots of good humor, frantic action. Everything having to do with the microbots was inspired. Yeah, I liked this quite a bit. 8/10

number8
12-24-2014, 04:25 AM
Very much an equal blend of Disney and Marvel. Heh, it even has a post-credit sequel tease AND a Stan Lee cameo.

Irish
01-09-2015, 12:29 PM
Outstanding art direction & animation but everything else about this was terrible.

Even for a Disney movie it was an entirely cynical exercise.

Wats raises a good point about Iron Giant, but at least that film played around with its characters and asked interesting questions. IG has a good message. Big Hero 6 doesn't give it a shit. It just wants to deliver the next trailer moment, the next set piece. And as many character designs as possible to pack the toy shelves.

I'm at the point where I cringe whenever I see Lasseter's name in the credits.

number8
01-09-2015, 06:11 PM
Are Disney movies typically cynical?

Irish
01-09-2015, 07:56 PM
You misunderstood my statement-- I'm not calling the story cynical. I'm calling the production and "creative" drive behind this thing cynical.

Maybe it's better to call it a mercenary exercise?

Watashi
01-09-2015, 08:40 PM
I don't see how designing a Disney movie to make action figures is cynical. That's how the studios makes its green. Hell, Disneyland had a whole meet n greet with Hiro and Baymax and the lines were over 3 hours long. Look how Frozen has completely dominated the Disney canon.

I don't think that means the directors/writers/animators just don't give a shit. There is clearly a good message in there which Fezzik aptly explains. This has actually something to say unlike the entire slate of Marvel Studio films.

Irish
01-09-2015, 09:22 PM
It felt like the entire project was developed from the ground up with merchandising in mind. Like a quirky, 90 minute toy commercial. Hence the carefully multi-ethnic, gender-inclusive cast, each of whom happen to have multiple character designs.

What was the message, exactly? Nerds are cool? And powerful? That's not a message. That's bald pandering. Every problem and every solution in this movie derives from weaponizing individual science projects. The plot grossly misrepresents any kind of career in STEM fields. It also reinforces aged cultural tropes about lone genius inventors. All of that seems both lazy and reckless to me.

I loved Baymax. But it was a little sad that the most human character in this movie was an inflatable robot.

Wryan
01-12-2015, 01:28 AM
The plot grossly misrepresents any kind of career in STEM fields.

Do you mean in terms of the Iron Man development/tech iteration montages? That's possibly par for the course for these kinds of things--plot dictates characters come up with things in hours that would realistically take months or years, but that seems to be true for many other fields on film as well. The movie's only so long. Or what else do you refer to? The lone, maverick scientists? (Students working on individual projects at a university level, but at least they are working within a supportive community framework and help one another.) The weaponization? (Is there such a thing as weaponization-for-good? Like stopping-a-supervillain-good in a kid's movie? It's also directly criticized in the movie nonetheless.)

This is a bit slight, but I had a good time. I'm a sucker for zoom-zoom sequences and self-sacrifice, generally. I'm confused when exactly the experiment went bad in relation to Callaghan's teaching career. If...that happened before, you'd think he'd be a lot more than just standoffish to Krei.

Hopefully a sequel will do something really solid with this groundwork.

Dead & Messed Up
01-12-2015, 02:32 AM
I knew going in that this was a Marvel story of some kind (I hadn't seen any promotional material except that insufferable ba-la-la-la fist boom), but still... that scene where Hiro struggles to stuff Baymax into a superhero outfit doubles for the film as a whole. Taking an interesting, new concept and making it about smashy-smashy splosion time. The rest of the hero team wasn't much fun, the villain "reveals" felt obvious. You wonder why they bother casting Maya Rudolph as a mom-type when they don't bother to give her a single memorable line. And at this point, one of those training montages where people go from novice to expert inside of 10 seconds just pisses me off (that one girl being unsure on those wheely things then going all Action Girl badass). As for the ending, why on Earth would it end with one of those action pose things (complete with narration), when it could end with Hiro demonstrating Baymax at a new symposium? Maybe honoring his brother in the process? Lord knows the world needs more Baymaxes than it does crime-fighting vigilantes.

How the film looks is a neat blend of American and Japanese styles - no one bats an eye at the kabuki mask, for example. The vision of the interdimensional world is lovely, a nowhere-world made of swirled cotton candy. I was expecting a limitless white field, given my love of "The Jaunt." Scott Adsit does a terrific job as Baymax. Although the film goes the route it goes on, I appreciated that the moral costs of defeating the villain were made clear, and that it didn't go the regrettable Up route of offering a standard hero plummet. I laughed hard when the microbots chased them for the first time and Baymax noted, "I am not fast."

Some of you are rightly commenting on the Iron Giant stuff, and yes, this film takes that climax and executes it with maybe a quarter of the emotion, but the first section carries some of the same gentler pleasures of My Neighbor Totoro and E. T. Which made the superhero developments disheartening. Maybe this is one where I should've spoiled myself on the whole story before I went in.

Irish
01-12-2015, 03:12 AM
Do you mean in terms of the Iron Man development/tech iteration montages? That's possibly par for the course for these kinds of things--plot dictates characters come up with things in hours that would realistically take months or years, but that seems to be true for many other fields on film as well. The movie's only so long. Or what else do you refer to? The lone, maverick scientists? (Students working on individual projects at a university level, but at least they are working within a supportive community framework and help one another.) The weaponization? (Is there such a thing as weaponization-for-good? Like stopping-a-supervillain-good in a kid's movie? It's also directly criticized in the movie nonetheless.).

Why should we accept "par for the course" for "these kinds of things"? Moving away from stock story elements would require more work and more imagination. This film isn't up for that, which is why I called it a cynical exercise. This movie was inspired by the same "creative" impulse that produced Bambi II and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time. And the Cars franchise.

Ps: I think you're wrong about Iron Man. While those films play to similar tropes, they treat those tropes differently in the details.

Watashi
01-12-2015, 07:01 PM
insufferable ba-la-la-la fist boom)

You take that back.

Dead & Messed Up
01-12-2015, 10:06 PM
"He did the ba-la-la-la thing again! It's funny!"

number8
01-12-2015, 10:46 PM
I chuckled the first time, but it actually got funnier each time. Comedy of repetition.

Wryan
01-13-2015, 12:11 AM
Ps: I think you're wrong about Iron Man. While those films play to similar tropes, they treat those tropes differently in the details.

Do you find the Tony Stark montages accurate reflections of real-world STEM work? EDIT: "Accurate," you know, etc.

Irish
01-13-2015, 10:38 AM
Do you find the Tony Stark montages accurate reflections of real-world STEM work? EDIT: "Accurate," you know, etc.

I wouldn't say it is accurate, at least in the way I think you mean. But for narrative reasons, Tony has his collaborators. Somebody to push off of. And there are times when his tech either doesn't work, or doesn't work as he expects it to. Stuff breaks.

Hiro invents everything in Big Hero 6 over the course of a few montages, without any help. When there are problems, those problems are down to human error, not bugs in the tech.

The "team" is largely useless and doesn't effect the main plot. Despite being positioned as super-nerd engineers, they don't use their brains to solve problems. Only Hiro does. The rest of them are there for thematic reasons. The movie takes a bunch of scrappy engineers and turns them into proto-jocks.

All of this bugs me because Big Hero 6 perpetuates two horrid myths:

(1) the lone-genius scribbling away in a lab, while STEM fields are highly collaborative
(2) the "Good Will Hunting" figure, who doesn't need to study or learn, because he was born knowing everything he needs to know. This pushes an archetype that's actually anti-education and anti-learning.

Mr. McGibblets
01-18-2015, 05:02 PM
This film gets a star deducted just for the atrocious theme song.

number8
01-21-2015, 03:49 PM
This film gets a star deducted just for the atrocious theme song.

It was the worst. And they played it like... 3 times?

Spinal
02-02-2015, 04:49 PM
The "team" is largely useless and doesn't effect the main plot. Despite being positioned as super-nerd engineers, they don't use their brains to solve problems. Only Hiro does. The rest of them are there for thematic reasons.

Or diversity reasons.

Spinal
02-02-2015, 09:34 PM
I thought this was good, not great. Reminded me not only of The Iron Giant, but also of the undervalued Astro Boy. I think this one falls well short of both of them. I appreciated the humor and the specificity of the universe. The theme of healing seemed a bit blunt and on-the-nose, and I didn't buy the villain's character arc.

Dukefrukem
02-15-2015, 12:39 AM
Are Frank and Irish the same person?

number8
03-09-2015, 03:19 PM
This is now the 3rd highest grossing Disney movie of all time, behind Frozen and The Lion King.

Dukefrukem
03-09-2015, 05:03 PM
So when you say Disney you're obviously leaving out Pixar. Why don't they count? "Disney's Pixar"

Sycophant
03-09-2015, 05:07 PM
Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios are two distinct entities

Hugh_Grant
04-07-2015, 05:00 PM
It's flawed, but I can't stop saying "Hairy baby" to my cat(s), and in Baymax-like intonation. Hairrrrry baby. Hairy baaaaby.

I want a Japanese bobtail now, but there is no room at the inn for another cat.

dreamdead
04-16-2015, 03:50 PM
I really liked the world building in this--seeing a Japanese-inspired America is one of the cooler visual aspects here. Also, the refusal to place Hiro into a romantic relationship with one of the two girls is something that pleased me, so that even though Go Go seemed a bit too stereotypically Trinity badass, the film refused to sublimate either her or Honey Lemon into mere romantic third wheel.

Naturally, Baymax is a wonder. The sequel needs to be just him and the cat for two hours.

Almost everything with Robert Callaghan doesn't make narrative sense. Although he's consumed with revenge, why is he trying to destroy Hiro throughout that all second act. It makes sense that he'd strike at Hiro and the others when they infringe upon his vengeance on Alistair, but it makes less sense that he'd wantonly try to destroy them all before that. His character's a mess.

number8
04-16-2015, 05:16 PM
Also, the refusal to place Hiro into a romantic relationship with one of the two girls is something that pleased me, so that even though Go Go seemed a bit too stereotypically Trinity badass, the film refused to sublimate either her or Honey Lemon into mere romantic third wheel.

Did you actually think this was a possibility? It would have been statutory rape territory, so that never even occurred to me as a direction they would have gone with.

[ETM]
04-16-2015, 05:37 PM
Almost everything with Robert Callaghan doesn't make narrative sense. Although he's consumed with revenge, why is he trying to destroy Hiro throughout that all second act. It makes sense that he'd strike at Hiro and the others when they infringe upon his vengeance on Alistair, but it makes less sense that he'd wantonly try to destroy them all before that. His character's a mess.

To be fair, he never actively pursued them, every time Hiro stumbled across him collecting the parts for the portal. However, why he'd build it for revenge instead of looking for his daughter is a mystery.

dreamdead
04-17-2015, 12:36 PM
Did you actually think this was a possibility? It would have been statutory rape territory, so that never even occurred to me as a direction they would have gone with.

I actually was worried that a romantic hook-up was a possibility. Cloudy with a Chance... and How to Train... both go the romantic route and have equally visualizations of young men "maturing" in part psychologically and romantically, so I expected that this one would find some way to reassemble the age difference.

All that to say, a lot of the charm here is in the world and design--the fundamental plot is less interesting.

Grouchy
06-29-2015, 04:45 PM
Fun movie. It's completely predictable, though, but the art direction and the lush animation make up for it.

You guys expected this to be CGI Primer? I don't get how someone can watch this and go "the science depicted here is not realistic".