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Stay Puft
03-17-2014, 09:05 PM
THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL
Dir. Wes Anderson

IMDb page (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2278388/)

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1406002/thumbs/o-GRAND-BUDAPEST-HOTEL-POSTER-570.jpg?6

Q & T
03-18-2014, 02:00 AM
Fucking A+++ movie.

Pop Trash
03-18-2014, 04:27 AM
Yeah it's pretty damn good. Ralph Fiennes has an uphill battle (early release date/a comedy) but he should get an Oscar nod for this. Slightly < Moonrise Kingdom for me and it plays tonally a bit like a live action version of Fantastic Mr. Fox, but I'm OK with that.

Also, like most W. Anderson I imagine this will only improve with multiple viewings. There's so much visual ephemera and incepted storytelling going on here.

eternity
03-23-2014, 02:42 AM
Too much, Wes. Too much. (http://www.statepress.com/2014/03/17/the-grand-budapest-hotel-proves-overwhelming-cinematic-experience/)

MarcusBrody
03-25-2014, 02:55 PM
I enjoyed the film a lot (and it was a clear Yay for me), but it didn't rank up there with my favorite of Wes Anderson's output (Rushmore, Moonrise, probably Royal Tenenbaums).

I think what I wanted was a little more development of the characters over the course of the film. Either they could be shown changing in response to the events depicted in the film, or we could learn a bit more about them as the film goes on. Instead I felt like I basically knew all I was going to about M. Gustave and Zero soon after we were introduced to them (though I guess their relationship dynamic becomes a bit more symmetrical as the film goes on). I wanted some of the character deepening that I like a lot in films like Rushmore and Moonrise Kingdom.

Another way to have gone would have been to ratchet up the importance of the plot and its mystery just a bit more. It was more important than in most of Anderson's films, but it still felt like it wasn't the film's reason to exist. Adding a bit more actual mystery would have helped in my mind, and I wouldn't have thought as much about the flat character arcs.

I think one part of this problem was how much we learned in the trailer. I tried to avoid it but-due to a lack of willpower and it showing with a number of films I've seen recent-but ended up watching it several times. It shows some of the good lines and gives the viewer a map of where the plot is going. I think I'd have liked the movie even more if I hadn't seen it.

Now all that sounds fairly negative, but it's more an explanation of why I only liked the film a lot rather than loved it. I really enjoyed all the performances, thought the visuals were fun, and would consider seeing it in the theater again. I'm curious to watch it while thinking about Zero's explanation of M. Gustave, his era, and why Zero kept the hotel.

Dukefrukem
03-30-2014, 02:51 AM
Quite easily the weakest Anderson film to date story wise. The casting, crafting of sets, the style all on track but man... I couldn't have cared any less about these characters.

My favorite part of the movie was the skiing.sledding bit.

There needs to be more Murray.

Watashi
03-30-2014, 04:05 AM
This is just A+ work all around.

Stay Puft
04-01-2014, 06:13 PM
I agree a bit with Marcus and eternity - I didn't find this as emotionally affecting as some of Anderson's previous work (Tenenbaums, Life Aquatic, first half of Moonrise) and the film's style does feel oppressive at times - and I'm not talking about the art design (which I adored). I thought the multiple aspect ratios were a bit distracting, for example (kinda wish the whole movie was just the 1.33:1 story, Anderson does a great job there) and the film feels overstuffed with characters and "recognizable faces" (down to a blink-and-you'll-miss-it Fisher Stevens cameo). Maybe it could have used some more room to breathe, or maybe it just needs another viewing to let it all unfold (Zero's reason for keeping the hotel didn't have any emotional weight for me, but maybe I was also focusing too much on Zero as the narrator when Gustave was at the center? I dunno).

These small reservations aside, however, the film is a ton of fun, and visually enthralling. The intricacies of the sets, costumes and special effects (much more successfully deployed here than in the second half of Moonrise, for example) beg for multiple viewings. I walked out of the theatre wanting to go right back in to experience it all again. This feels like the closest Anderson will get to making a rollercoaster thrill ride, full of mystery and murder and action set pieces (and like Pop Trash says, it sort of plays like a live action Fantastic Mr. Fox, and that's awesome).

Ralph Fiennes is incredible, too. He fills out the character of Gustave with so much tenderness and integrity, and his sudden expletive-laced outbursts are amazing, too, and provide some of the biggest laughs of the film. It's a brilliant comedic performance. Also want to make mention of Adrien Brody's performance, which was delightful in its own small way. The scene where he discovers "Boy with Apple" is missing killed me.

dreamdead
04-08-2014, 06:10 PM
Ralph Fiennes is incredible, too. He fills out the character of Gustave with so much tenderness and integrity, and his sudden expletive-laced outbursts are amazing, too, and provide some of the biggest laughs of the film. It's a brilliant comedic performance.

This. The switcheroo as Dafoe was going in for the kill at the mountain edge was incredible. Some of it is so madcap and speedily moving through tones, especially regarding Saoirse Ronan's fate, yet the bitterness of the war suffused it with that rancor. The way that Anderson finally reveals the degree to which the war impresses itself on these characters was interesting, too.

Need to think about it some more. Really liked it, though.

number8
04-11-2014, 03:30 AM
Zero.

EyesWideOpen
04-13-2014, 09:58 PM
This was good but a definite stepdown from the greatness of Moonrise Kingdom. I'll still take lesser Anderson over most other director's these days.

Kurosawa Fan
04-19-2014, 01:40 PM
My gut reaction is that this is among Anderson's best work. Maybe even his best. I absolutely loved it.

[ETM]
04-20-2014, 03:02 PM
Indeed. I thought it got right everything that I disliked about Moonrise Kingdom.

Ezee E
04-21-2014, 01:35 AM
Loved the music in it.

Sven
04-27-2014, 11:28 PM
My gut reaction is that this is among Anderson's best work. Maybe even his best. I absolutely loved it.

This is my take too. Need to watch Darjeeling again to see, but I'm inclined to think it's a masterwork. It firmly lands in square A1 of my Great Cinema rubric. K wasn't as taken, echoing some of the hesitances expressed in this thread, but I'm unsympathetic--every scene was rapturous and witty and layered.

dreamdead
04-28-2014, 02:57 AM
My biggest complaint about this is personal more than anything, and it's that I'd like to feel that one of Anderson's strongest films legitimately focuses on the women's perspective to some degree, and Ronan's narrative here is marginalized a little too heavily. It's why I feel that Royal, Fox, and Moonrise might be his best work.

Derek
04-28-2014, 03:33 AM
It's why I feel that Royal, Fox, and Moonrise might be his best work.

Huh. I can see Moonrise for Suzy, but I'd say Rushmore's Rosemary Cross remains Wes's most compelling female character and I'd even take Margaret Yang over any female character in Tenenbaums and Fox. But I think Rushmore is still easily his best film, and one of the best comedies ever, for many other reasons aside from the sexes of its most developed characters.

EDIT: This is my second fave film of his. Quite remarkable.

MadMan
04-30-2014, 08:22 PM
Loved this film. There were elements of 30s Hitchcock and the ski chase was straight out of a Bond flick. The ski lift scenes reminded me of Night Train to Munch. Grand Budapest Hotel had bits from Royal Tenenbaums, The Life Aquatic, and even Rushmore. This is one of his best films.

MadMan
04-30-2014, 08:25 PM
Some days I think his best is The Life Aquatic. Other times its Rushmore.

baby doll
05-01-2014, 04:14 PM
So what's the deal with Harvey Keitel's torso twitching?

Rowland
05-01-2014, 06:00 PM
So what's the deal with Harvey Keitel's torso twitching?He keeps flexing and unflexing his muscles.

D_Davis
05-01-2014, 06:22 PM
Bottle Rocket is still his best.

It's the only film of his that I find sincere anymore, because it isn't so far up its own
story-book-world-of make-believe ass.

Anderson fell too in love with his own aesthetic, and forgot the earnest, sincere joy and humanity found in Bottle Rocket.

Everything about his post-BR films seems so manufactured and disingenuous.

Watashi
05-01-2014, 06:58 PM
Yes, how dare directors fall in love with their own craft. They should distance themselves from their personal style and only present the raw realism of humanity through an unfiltered lens.

number8
05-01-2014, 07:48 PM
I only really like Fantastic Mr. Fox. He should do more animation. The best parts of this movie are the stop-motion scenes.

amberlita
05-02-2014, 03:40 AM
The tone of this movie is just weird. Standard Wes Anderson quirky and charming style, but with some truly dreadful things happening on screen. Didn't work for me.

baby doll
05-02-2014, 04:14 AM
Bottle Rocket is still his best.

It's the only film of his that I find sincere anymore, because it isn't so far up its own
story-book-world-of make-believe ass.

Anderson fell too in love with his own aesthetic, and forgot the earnest, sincere joy and humanity found in Bottle Rocket.

Everything about his post-BR films seems so manufactured and disingenuous.The film's style is inseparable from its overall achievement, which is to create a sense of nostalgia for a fairy tale pre-war Europe that never really existed except in the films of Ernst Lubitsch, lending a touch of gravity (not much but enough) to what is otherwise a delightfully silly movie. (Probably its closest cousin in terms of tone would be Fantastic Mr. Fox in which the villains are very, very bad people to the point of self-parody.)

Ezee E
05-02-2014, 04:50 AM
My only gripe with this one is it took a while for it to get rolling.

Moonrise Kingdom, Royal Tenenbaums worked right from the get go.

monolith94
05-02-2014, 06:57 PM
Loved this film. The museum chase sequence in particular struck a chord with me, felt very Wellesian.

I simply can't understand people who don't like stuff like this. This seems just as earnest, joyful and humane as bottle rocket, with the added upside of being delightfully imaginative and creative.

Boner M
05-04-2014, 02:05 AM
I found this pretty delightful, and I'd like to see it again, but I can't shake the feeling that behind all the bluster & dollhouse theatrics & Criterion Collection-ised idea of cinephilia, there's a stale 'bros before hos' sentiment at its core (most apparent in the relegation of Ronan's character, as dreamdead mentions). Still, it's pretty top-notch as far as surface pleasures go.

Also, Edward Norton should not be in Wes Anderson films. Sticks out like a sore thumb here and in Moonrise.

Pop Trash
05-04-2014, 05:37 PM
Also, Edward Norton should not be in Wes Anderson films. Sticks out like a sore thumb here and in Moonrise.

I couldn't disagree more, even if I liked him a bit more in Moonrise than this.

[ETM]
05-04-2014, 09:14 PM
I couldn't disagree more, even if I liked him a bit more in Moonrise than this.

I thought he was infinitely better in GBH.

MadMan
05-10-2014, 05:51 PM
Loved this film. The museum chase sequence in particular struck a chord with me, felt very Wellesian.

I simply can't understand people who don't like stuff like this. This seems just as earnest, joyful and humane as bottle rocket, with the added upside of being delightfully imaginative and creative.Beats me. I'm in love with Anderson's films, even though I've only given three of his movies perfect scores and I don't get the love for Fantastic Mr. Fox. I mean its a really good movie, but I prefer everything else he's done over it (we're only talking about the full length movies and not the shorts).

Oh and Edward Norton has been great in both Anderson movies he's been in. The one actor I thought didn't fit in was Harvey Keitel for some reason. He felt out of place. I can't explain why exactly.

Qrazy
05-27-2014, 08:01 AM
This was good I guess but so utterly insubstantial.

Milky Joe
05-30-2014, 05:10 AM
This was good I guess but so utterly insubstantial.

Just curious, but have you ever considered that it might be your perception which is insubstantial?

number8
05-30-2014, 05:53 PM
This movie is like toilet paper. I'm glad it's there for me and I enjoyed the sensation of its work, but after we're done there's really no reason to keep it around. Also the cuts are symmetrical.

Sven
05-30-2014, 11:13 PM
This movie is like toilet paper. I'm glad it's there for me and I enjoyed the sensation of its work, but after we're done there's really no reason to keep it around. Also the cuts are symmetrical.

Burden of proof is on you: what's a truly indispensible film?

Qrazy
05-31-2014, 01:36 PM
Just curious, but have you ever considered that it might be your perception which is insubstantial?

Yes, I have considered that and then discarded it as itself an insubstantial assessment of my substantial perception.

Grouchy
06-08-2014, 06:08 PM
At this point I can do nothing but consider Wes Anderson a genius. Even Darjeeling Limited, which I disliked, seems like an integral part of his body of work now.

Hard to think of a more appropriate actor than Ed Norton for Anderson's aesthetic. And those "gender" analysis of the film are depressing to say the least. Like, what the fuck could be useful about Ronan's perspective? She's not the lead.

Thirdmango
06-27-2014, 11:16 AM
The first time I tried to watch this was right after my friend's funeral so I was physically and mentally exhausted and I wasn't prepared for the new insanely comfortable chairs that the theater I went to had, so I ended up paying 7 dollars for a 40 minute nap. Now that I've seen it again I can say I love it, but I also timed it to see how long I did actually nap for.

Yxklyx
07-20-2014, 05:31 AM
Pretty disappointing given all the praise - still a mild yeah. Will forget totally about it in a few years.

transmogrifier
07-27-2014, 02:23 AM
A mild nay. Nothing really interesting happening underneath all of this, and the surface is clogged up with cameos and twee happenings. An easy watch, but ultimately dissatisfying. Why was Ronan's character even in it?

Anderson ranked:

1. Rushmore
2. The Darjeeling Limited
3. Fantastic Mr. Fox
4. The Life Aquatic

Below this line, reservations begin.

5. The Royal Tenenbaums
6. Bottle Rocket
7. The Grand Budapest Hotel
8. Moonrise Kingdom

Pop Trash
07-27-2014, 04:03 AM
Anderson ranked:

2. The Darjeeling Limited
4. The Life Aquatic

Below this line, reservations begin.

7. The Grand Budapest Hotel
8. Moonrise Kingdom

Maaan fuck that noise.

transmogrifier
07-27-2014, 04:10 AM
"Noise" is an excellent description of Anderson's last two films (well, the third act of MK, at least). So much stuff, so little to care about.)

ledfloyd
07-27-2014, 04:13 AM
1. Moonrise Kingdom
2. Darjeeling Limited
3. Life Aquatic
4. Fantastic Mr. Fox/Grand Budapest Hotel
---Reservation Line---
5. Rushmore
6. The Royal Tenenbaums
7. Bottle Rocket

Melville
07-27-2014, 09:10 AM
1. Rushmore
2. The Royal Tenenbaums
3. Moonrise Kingdom
4. Bottle Rocket
---Reservation Line---
5. Grand Budapest Hotel
6. Darjeeling Limited
7. Fantastic Mr. Fox
8. Life Aquatic

Life Aquatic was the critical point when he went from distinctly stylized but emotionally grounded stories to hyper-art-designed cartoon-world stories. Moonrise Kingdom is the only one of his movies that completely works for me in that latter vein, though with the exception of Life Aquatic, I like them all to some degree.

Peng
07-27-2014, 10:37 AM
1. The Royal Tenenbaums
2. Moonrise Kingdom
3. The Grand Budapest Hotel
4. Fantastic Mr. Fox

5. Rushmore
6. The Life Aquatic of Steve Zissou

7. Bottle Rocket
8. The Darjeeling Limited


The middle group needs rewatches. On first watch I can't get over what a realistically portrayed creep Max Fischer is. There are enough effusive praises for Steve Zissou from people I really respect that I'm curious if a second viewing will make all the elements coalesce more for me.

EyesWideOpen
07-27-2014, 01:14 PM
1. Moonrise Kingdom
2. Rushmore
3. Fantastic Mr. Fox
4. The Darjeeling Limited
5. The Royal Tenebaums
6. Bottle Rocket

--Reservation Line--

7. The Grand Budapest Hotel
8. The Life Aquatic

Raiders
07-27-2014, 01:26 PM
Oh sure...

1. Moonrise Kingdom
2. The Royal Tenenbaums
3. The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou
4. Fantastic Mr. Fox
5. The Grand Budapest Hotel
6. The Darjeeling Limited
7. Rushmore
8. Bottle Rocket

I guess I prefer "hyper-art-designed cartoon worlds." I know that's not true and that there is more emotion for me in every frame of Life Aquatic over his earliest two films. Still a fan of all of them though.

This particular film is hard for me to really say much about. It is great in the ways Anderson is great, but it is far less emotionally connecting for me than his most successful films. Fiennes is great, but there simply doesn't exist an intriguing, flawed central character that is as large as the rest of the film such as Royal Tenenbaum or Steve Zissou (or even Max).

Kurosawa Fan
07-27-2014, 01:32 PM
Why not.

1. Rushmore
2. The Grand Budapest Hotel
3. The Royal Tenenbaums
4. The Life Aquatic
5. Bottle Rocket
----Reservation Line-----
6. The Darjeeling Limited
7. The Fantastic Mr. Fox
8. Moonrise Kingdom

A second viewing of Kingdom wasn't kind. All of its flaws took center stage and I'm not even sure I enjoyed it all that much.

DSNT
07-27-2014, 02:05 PM
I'll play.

1. Rushmore
2. Fantastic Mr. Fox
3. The Grand Budapest Hotel
4. Bottle Rocket
5. The Rotal Tenenbaums
6. Moonrise Kingdom
7. The Life Aquatic
8. The Darjeeling Limited

The Life Aquatic is due for a revisit since I haven't seen it since release. Agreed with KF about Moonrise.

As much as I respect his talent as a filmmaker, I'd like to see him break from form and try something different.

Dukefrukem
07-27-2014, 02:12 PM
"Noise" is an excellent description of Anderson's last two films (well, the third act of MK, at least). So much stuff, so little to care about.)

This is so weird, I agree with Trans.

Anderson's last two films just have stacked up to the first 4 he put out.

Dukefrukem
07-27-2014, 02:14 PM
1. The Life Aquatic
2. Rushmore
3. Bottle Rocket
4. The Royal Tenenbaums
5. The Darjeeling Limited
---Reservation Line---
6. Moonrise Kingdom
7. The Grand Budapest Hotel

Haven't seen: Fantastic Mr. Fox

transmogrifier
07-27-2014, 03:15 PM
It's fascinating to see the rankings all over the place.

Sycophant
07-27-2014, 03:19 PM
I have no reservation line.

I'm going to try ranking these, but it could like different at almost any conceivable moment:

1. The Royal Tenenbaums
2. The Darjeeling Limited
3. Bottle Rocket
4. Rushmore
5. The Life Aquatic
6. Moonrise Kingdom
7. The Grand Budapest Hotel
8. The Fantastic Mr. Fox

With the exception of Mr. Fox and maybe Grand Budapest, these are all basically my favorite films of their given years. Anderson is my favorite working American director, to be sure.

Watashi
07-27-2014, 03:32 PM
No point ranking Wes. They're all masterpieces.

Pop Trash
07-27-2014, 08:13 PM
1. The Royal Tenenbaums
2. Moonrise Kingdom
3. Rushmore
4. The Grand Budapest Hotel
5. Fantastic Mr. Fox
6. Bottle Rocket
--Reservation Row--
7. The Darjeeling Limited (probably needs a rewatch)
8. The Life Aquatic

Gittes
07-27-2014, 08:23 PM
This thread made me think back to Jeff Goldblum's last scene in The Grand Budapest Hotel. Amazing. That film is a delight, and probably my favourite after the The Royal Tenenbaums. I haven't seen The Life Aquatic or Rushmore, though.

Also, Dignan's line in Bottle Rocket is one of my favourites: "They'll never catch me... because I'm fucking innocent."

Pop Trash
07-27-2014, 08:32 PM
Also, Dignan's line in Bottle Rocket is one of my favourites: "They'll never catch me... because I'm fucking innocent."

hahahaha isn't that a Guns N' Roses line from "Out to Get Me?"

Melville
07-27-2014, 08:35 PM
"They'll never catch me... because I'm fucking innocent."
I love that line. Dignan in general is great. Like a sad, unhinged Tom Sawyer.

ledfloyd
07-27-2014, 08:53 PM
Life Aquatic was the critical point when he went from distinctly stylized but emotionally grounded stories to hyper-art-designed cartoon-world stories. Moonrise Kingdom is the only one of his movies that completely works for me in that latter vein, though with the exception of Life Aquatic, I like them all to some degree.
First, since a lot of people are talking about needing a rewatch of Life Aquatic. I rewatched it a month ago and hadn't seen it since it first hit DVD. If you had asked me prior to that rewatch, I would have told you it was my least favorite Wes Anderson film. I don't know if his subsequent films helped me contextualize it or what, but there was very little I didn't like about it when I sat down to revisit it.

Second, I think there is significantly more feeling in his "hyper-art-designed cartoon-worlds" than there was present in his earlier, more grounded films. The moment when I first "got" Wes was during The Darjeeling Limited when they attempt to rescue the Indian child in the river. It was the first time I ever felt something watching one of his films. Fantastic Mr. Fox felt revelatory to me, as if he should have been making films with puppets all along. More likely he had just been using humans as puppets all along, which may be why I feel a disconnect with regard to his earliest work. Grand Budapest does seem to be lacking the emotional element he threaded through the previous three or four films, but it works for me because it's basically a treatise on the politics of style, and I'm really all-in with him at this point.

I'll admit I need a rewatch of Rushmore, but I've seen The Royal Tenenbaums enough to know it's never going to be more than a 7/10 film for me. Bottle Rocket has diminished for me with each viewing, though I frequently paraphrase the "I can't do a job like that because I don't have the tools, and even if I did have the tools I'm not sure I could do a job like that!" line.

Sven
07-27-2014, 10:16 PM
I will endeavor to rank:

Darjeeling
Budapest
Tenenbaums
Zissou
Fox
Moonrise
Bottle
Rushmore

Melville
07-30-2014, 02:16 PM
First, since a lot of people are talking about needing a rewatch of Life Aquatic. I rewatched it a month ago and hadn't seen it since it first hit DVD. If you had asked me prior to that rewatch, I would have told you it was my least favorite Wes Anderson film. I don't know if his subsequent films helped me contextualize it or what, but there was very little I didn't like about it when I sat down to revisit it.
I actually haven't seen it since its opening day in theaters. I might like it more now that I've grown accustomed to his more cartoony films.


Second, I think there is significantly more feeling in his "hyper-art-designed cartoon-worlds" than there was present in his earlier, more grounded films. The moment when I first "got" Wes was during The Darjeeling Limited when they attempt to rescue the Indian child in the river. It was the first time I ever felt something watching one of his films. Fantastic Mr. Fox felt revelatory to me, as if he should have been making films with puppets all along. More likely he had just been using humans as puppets all along, which may be why I feel a disconnect with regard to his earliest work. Grand Budapest does seem to be lacking the emotional element he threaded through the previous three or four films, but it works for me because it's basically a treatise on the politics of style, and I'm really all-in with him at this point.
That scene in Darjeeling fell flat for me. It felt like a very forced attempt at a revelatory emotional moment for the emotional-tourist characters. It stood out against moments I love in his earlier films—moments like the suicide attempt in Royal Tenenbaums and Miss Cross's confrontation of Max in Rushmore—that puncture the artifice and tether the quirkiness to real human pain.


I'll admit I need a rewatch of Rushmore, but I've seen The Royal Tenenbaums enough to know it's never going to be more than a 7/10 film for me. Bottle Rocket has diminished for me with each viewing, though I frequently paraphrase the "I can't do a job like that because I don't have the tools, and even if I did have the tools I'm not sure I could do a job like that!" line.
I've seen Rushmore and Tenenbaums countless times, but I haven't seen Bottle Rocket since around (or maybe before) Rushmore's time. My high rating of Bottle Rocket comes almost entirely from vague memories of Dignan and that final line of his.

Milky Joe
07-31-2014, 11:06 PM
The Life Aquatic is easily his least cartoonish film, red caps notwithstanding.

Melville
08-01-2014, 11:55 AM
The Life Aquatic is easily his least cartoonish film, red caps notwithstanding.
Yeah, besides the cartoon costumes, cartoon submarine, cartoon creatures, and cartoon villain...

Grouchy
08-01-2014, 04:25 PM
The Life Aquatic is easily his least cartoonish film, red caps notwithstanding.
What a weird thing to say.

Dukefrukem
08-01-2014, 06:15 PM
Rushmore is way less cartoonish than The Life Aquatic. Same with Bottlerocket.

The Life Aquatic had trained dolphins that swim under the ship.

ledfloyd
08-01-2014, 07:41 PM
Fantastic Mr. Fox is his most cartoonish film.

Pop Trash
08-01-2014, 07:47 PM
A VERY IMPORTANT RANKING OF WES ANDERSON FROM MOST CARTOONISH TO LEAST CARTOONISH:

1. Fantastic Mr. Fox
2. The Life Aquatic
3. The Royal Tenenbaums
4. Moonrise Kingdom
5. The Grand Budapest Hotel
6. Rushmore
7. The Darjeeling Limited
8. Bottle Rocket

D_Davis
08-01-2014, 07:51 PM
1. Bottle Rocket








the rest

Melville
08-01-2014, 08:30 PM
A VERY IMPORTANT RANKING OF WES ANDERSON FROM MOST CARTOONISH TO LEAST CARTOONISH:

1. Fantastic Mr. Fox
2. The Life Aquatic
3. The Royal Tenenbaums
4. Moonrise Kingdom
5. The Grand Budapest Hotel
6. Rushmore
7. The Darjeeling Limited
8. Bottle Rocket
Grand Budapest less cartoonish than Tenenbaums? Grand Budapest struck me as one of his most cartoonish. Maybe even more than the one that was actually a cartoon.

Pop Trash
08-01-2014, 08:44 PM
Grand Budapest less cartoonish than Tenenbaums? Grand Budapest struck me as one of his most cartoonish. Maybe even more than the one that was actually a cartoon.

Tenenbaums has a distinct Charles Schulz quality to it, even if you took out the "Peanuts" music. Plus I think the characters' immediately recognizable outfits give them an unemployed superhero style. There's a reason why The Life Aquatic and Tenenbaums are the most popular Wes Anderson movies on Halloween.

ledfloyd
08-01-2014, 10:58 PM
Tenenbaums is definitely cartoonish, but Grand Budapest is as close to Fantastic Mr. Fox as it gets without being animated.

Milky Joe
08-02-2014, 10:20 PM
The cartoonish aspect of TLA is entirely Steve Zissou's directorial creation, his virtuoso attempt to live in his films and remain a child forever. Underneath this meta-layer the film is raw and utterly realistic. But I forgive you if you don't agree. :p

Dead & Messed Up
01-17-2015, 05:10 PM
This was a fun caper film, and I liked how sadness peeked at the edges of the story, although Anderson seems fearful of naked emotion - when adult Zero cries, it loses punch in the context of on-the-nose narration and twee music. Which is likely the point, but I wonder if the film needs to consistently be one remove from reality. The aspect ratio shifts were a fun touch, as was the nested structure, which goes some way toward justifying the artifice of the film.

Weirdly, the film reminded me of Cronenberg's Existenz, a film I liked very much, in how it plays like a summation of all of Anderson's previous work. Here are the chapter cards. Here are the miniatures. Here's every actor Anderson has ever worked with. And like Cronenberg's film, this one feels a bit shallow. Not a huge deal given the caper angle.

Fiennes is absolutely perfect, one of my favorite characters of Anderson's. His nomination is well preserved. Good movie with a great performance.

Watashi
01-17-2015, 05:41 PM
His nomination is well preserved. Good movie with a great performance.

:|:|

Dead & Messed Up
01-17-2015, 10:09 PM
:|:|

Heck, I'd go as far as very good to mostly excellent. One I'd be happy to watch again.

Unless you're hinting at the embarrassing autocorrect to "preserved."

Lazlo
01-17-2015, 10:15 PM
Heck, I'd go as far as very good to mostly excellent. One I'd be happy to watch again.

Unless you're hinting at the embarrassing autocorrect to "preserved."

I think he's :| at the fact that Fiennes didn't get nominated, deserved or not.

Dead & Messed Up
01-18-2015, 01:02 AM
I think he's :| at the fact that Fiennes didn't get nominated, deserved or not.

Holy crap, I thought he did.

Wait, neither he nor Gyllenhaal got nominated? Preposterous.

TGM
01-18-2015, 01:07 AM
Yup, they were nominated for the Golden Globe, though.

MadMan
01-18-2015, 08:08 AM
Fucking Academy. At least this got Best Director and Picture noms.

Spinal
03-02-2015, 06:12 PM
I think I have lost interest in this director. This was a chore to get through. The rhythms, the framing, the casting ... it's all so familiar. And when the themes are so insubstantial, I begin to wonder why I'm bothering. Maybe it's not any better or worse than previous Wes Anderson films. But I really felt like I was watching it out of duty more than anything else.

transmogrifier
03-03-2015, 01:19 AM
Yeah, I don't understand the adulation for this. I thought it was all surface (and a clumsy, cluttered surface at that) and absolutely nothing underneath. Nice to look at, but only very mildly diverting as a reminder of his older, better movies.

Ivan Drago
03-03-2015, 05:01 AM
I don't like Wes Anderson at all, yet I consider this one of his best, and probably his funniest movie.

Dukefrukem
03-03-2015, 01:23 PM
I don't like Wes Anderson at all, yet I consider this one of his best, and probably his funniest movie.

Have you seen all of his movies?

number8
03-03-2015, 04:15 PM
Yeah, I don't understand the adulation for this. I thought it was all surface (and a clumsy, cluttered surface at that) and absolutely nothing underneath. Nice to look at, but only very mildly diverting as a reminder of his older, better movies.

When you find all of his movies all surface with nothing underneath, you like the one with the best surface. So I like this movie.

Spinal
03-03-2015, 04:47 PM
This film has the most pointless framing device(s) I think I've ever seen. It was like hiding a medicore Christmas present in three nested boxes just to make it more 'fun'.

Philip J. Fry
06-26-2017, 09:55 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rr99prkfs0g